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6:01am

Mon July 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Reading And Writing Slow Dementia, Study Says

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:46 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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5:50am

Mon July 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Dozens Killed By Shots Fired At Pro-Morsi Gathering In Cairo

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:44 am

A wounded man is helped from the scene Monday in Cairo after shots were fired during a protest against the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
Mohammed Saber EPA /LANDOV

(This post was last updated at 5:45 p.m. ET.)

An already dangerous, volatile situation turned even deadlier early Monday in Cairo when dozens of people were killed at a protest outside the Republican Guard facility where it's believed ousted President Mohammed Morsi is being held. Most of those who died are reported to have been among a large group of Morsi's supporters.

Update at 5:45 p.m. ET. Date Set For Egypt's Election

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2:52am

Mon July 8, 2013
Parallels

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:12 pm

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops.
Jackie Northam/NPR

U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement aimed at generating billions of dollars of new trade. But negotiators must overcome barriers created by cultural and philosophical differences over sectors like agriculture. In Europe, the cultivation of genetically modified crops is banned, while in the U.S., they are a central part of food production. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a farm in Delaware and NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited one in Burgundy, France, to look at those deep-seated differences. We hear from Jackie first.

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2:42am

Mon July 8, 2013
Shots - Health News

Finding Simple Tests For Brain Disorders Turns Out To Be Complex

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:17 pm

Anne Jones, 62, and Robin Jones, 73, at their home in Menlo Park, Calif. He took a test that revealed proteins typical of Alzheimer's disease.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

If you're having chest pain, your doctor can test you for a heart attack. If you're having hip pain, your doctor could test for osteoarthritis.

But what if you're depressed? Or anxious? Currently there are no physical tests for most disorders that affect the mind. Lab tests like these could transform the field of mental illness. So far efforts to come up with biomarkers for common mental health disorders have proved largely fruitless.

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2:41am

Mon July 8, 2013
Parallels

Call Centers Call On Multilingual Portuguese

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 12:04 pm

New employees train for call center work at Teleperformance Portugal, an outsourcing company in Lisbon. The outsourcing industry is adding thousands of jobs while other Portuguese industries shed them.
Jose Faria Courtesy of Teleperformance Portugal

Filipa Neves speaks five languages but still couldn't find steady work in her native Portugal. So she was about to move to Angola, a former Portuguese colony in Africa, where the economy is booming.

But she sent off one last resumé — to a call center. It was sort of a last resort. She'd heard the stereotype.

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