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4:42pm

Tue March 17, 2015
Around the Nation

Lost Camera Survives Two Years Submerged In Wyoming's Salt River

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now a story of lost and found. It was 2012. A man from Idaho went fishing on Wyoming's Salt River with his father.

DON GONYEA, HOST:

John Cassinelli says he and his dad were having a nice time.

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4:42pm

Tue March 17, 2015
U.S.

Sex Discrimination Trial Puts Silicon Valley Under The Microscope

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Ellen Pao, a former partner at Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, says women were excluded from all-male meetings at the company and denied seats on boards. The firm says she was fired for poor performance.
Robert Galbraith Reuters/Landov

When the venture capital firm that funded Google and Amazon fired Ellen Pao in 2012, it said it let her go because she didn't have what it takes.

Pao disagreed — and sued her former employer, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, for gender bias and retaliation. The trial, now underway in San Francisco, is providing a rare look into allegations of sex discrimination and the world of venture capital.

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4:42pm

Tue March 17, 2015
Code Switch

Can New York Police Build Trust Among Public Housing Residents?

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 7:18 pm

Reginald Britt first moved into the Taft Houses, a public housing complex in East Harlem, in 1976
Alexandra Starr

In New York City, the police department has been re-examining the way it patrols public housing since the shooting late last year of Akai Gurley. Gurley, who was African American, was unarmed when he was fatally shot by a rookie officer in a Brooklyn housing complex. His death highlighted tensions between police and the people who live in public housing.

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4:31pm

Tue March 17, 2015
The Salt

Tea Tuesdays: South America Runs On Yerba Mate

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:37 pm

A gourd of yerba mate. Legend has it that the moon gifted this infusion to the GuaranĂ­ people of South America.
iStockphoto

In 1616, Hernando Arias de Saavedra, the governor of the Spanish province that included Buenos Aires, banned the population from drinking a green herbal drink called yerba mate.

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4:22pm

Tue March 17, 2015
The Two-Way

European Allies Defy U.S. In Joining China-Led Development Bank

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Asian leaders approved an agreement on the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank in Beijing in Oct., 2014. European countries are beginning to sign up too.
Takaki Yajima AP

Four key European allies have broken ranks with the U.S. to join a major new development bank created by China. Germany, France, and Italy today agreed to join the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. Last week, the U.K., one of America's staunchest allies, became the first Western nation to join the new bank.

The Obama administration opposes the AIIB, due to open later this year, and has pressured allies such as South Korea, Japan and Australia not to join the new bank. The administration says there's no need for another international lending institution.

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