national weather service

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP/WMOT)  --  Autumn's arrival Saturday closes the door on one of the hottest, driest summers ever recorded in Tennessee.

Tennesseans got a break from the sweltering heat in the latter part of July and all of August, but June was both very hot and extremely dry.

Nashville set an all-time heat record on June 29 when the temperature reached 109 degrees.

Meteorologist Sam Herron of the Weather Service office in Nashville says he’s expecting fall temperatures slightly above normal, and as for rain…

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  The National Weather Service says the heat wave Middle Tennessee is enduring has broken high temperature records dating back to the 1870s.

The Weather Service office in Nashville says a temperature of 109 degrees was recorded at the airport on Friday afternoon, a new all-time record. Murfreesboro also set a new record, hitting an all-time high of 108 degrees.

Lead forecaster Sam Shamburger says we’re going to see some change in the weather this week.

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  --  The National Weather Service has concluded its investigation of the tornados that struck Tennessee February 29 and March 2.

A total of six tornados caused damage in eight counties, including Cheatham, Cumberland, DeKalb, Fentrass, Jackson, Putman, Overton  and White counties.

Two of the tornados were classified as EF0, the lowest designation, while two more were classified as EF1, and the final two were EF2. An EF 2 can have sustained winds of up to 135 miles an hour.

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  --  During those extra-warm March days a lot of folks couldn’t resist buying and set out their spring plants. Those tender shoots may be at risk the next couple of mornings as temperatures fall to near freezing.

Trevor Boucher, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Nashville says Middle Tennessee could see some frost the next two mornings.

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP/WMOT) — Tennessee isn't the only part of the country enjoying unusually warm temperatures. Golfers are already hitting the links in Minnesota.

From the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic coast, areas where residents are normally bundled up against the cold in March are enjoying clear skies and temperatures in the 70s.

Forecasters say spring is early and here to stay.

The National Weather Service says the weather pattern is a random, normal fluctuation and can be attributed in part to a La Nina pattern in the Pacific Ocean.