no child left behind

NASHVILLE, Tenn (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam says he hopes Tennessee's waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind education law boosts teacher morale.

President Barack Obama announced yesterday that Tennessee is among 10 states to receive the waiver.

No Child Left Behind requires all students to be proficient in reading and math by 2014, which critics say is unrealistic.

Phil Waldrop, the Associate Dean at Middle Tennessee State’s College of Education says it’s one less thing for teachers to worry about.

The Tennessee Department of Education is making some changes to a waiver that would allow the state to opt out of the federal No Child Left Behind law.

Tennessee asked the federal government for the waiver back in July.

State Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman says Tennessee had little choice but to ask for relief from the law’s increasingly strict standards for yearly improvement in student test scores.  He says that nearly 80% of Tennessee schools will likely fail to meet federal standards in the current school year.

Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander says lawmakers should work together to make needed changes to the federal education program by no later than Christmas.