6:31am

Mon April 15, 2013
Top Stories

Push for Education Bills in Final Days of Session

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers trying to wrap up the General Assembly this month are hoping to push through two key education proposals.

One measure would create a state panel to authorize charter schools for five Tennessee counties and the other seeks to clear the way for cities to begin forming municipal school systems.

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6:22am

Mon April 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Threats And Crises Are 'Just Normal North Korean Diplomacy'

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 10:58 am

North Korean soldiers marched past statues of founder Kim Il Sung and his son, former leader Kim Jong Il, on Monday in Pyongyang. North Korea celebrated Kim Il Sung's 101st birthday.
Kyodo /Landov
  • On 'Morning Edition': Steve Inskeep speaks with Andrei Lankov about North Korea

Monday is "the day of the sun" in North Korea — a celebration of founder Kim Il Sung's birth in 1912.

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6:09am

Mon April 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Yoko Ono Is Writing A Book Of 'Instructional Poetry'

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 6:10 am

Yoko Ono poses during the opening of her exhibition "half-a-wind show" in Frankfurt, Germany.
Daniel Roland AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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5:25am

Mon April 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Venezuela Says Recount Likely After Chavez Heir's Close Win

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 7:30 pm

Supporters of acting President Nicolas Maduro celebrated Sunday night in Caracas, Venezuela, after the initial vote count showed him enjoying a narrow victory.
Luis Acosta AFP/Getty Images

A surprisingly small victory margin for Hugo Chavez's hand-picked successor in Sunday's special presidential election looks likely to be followed by a recount in Venezuela.

Chavez, Venezuela's fiery, controversial and charismatic leader, died on March 5.

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3:45am

Mon April 15, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Exercise And Other Activities Beat Back Dementia

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:45 am

An older man performs exercises in Mumbai, India. Research suggests that moderate physical exercise may be the best way to keep our brains healthy as we age.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

The numbers are pretty grim: More than half of all 85-year-olds suffer some form of dementia.

But here's the good news: Brain researchers say there are ways to boost brain power and stave off problems in memory and thinking.

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2:05am

Mon April 15, 2013
Shots - Health News

Inside The Brains Of People Over 80 With Exceptional Memory

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:45 am

Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer.
Samantha Murphy for NPR

Most research on memory loss in the elderly focuses on dementia, Alzheimer's disease or other brain diseases.

But neuroscientist Emily Rogalski from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine knew there is great variation in how good memory is in older people. Most have memory loss to varying degrees, but some have strong memories, even well into old age.

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2:01am

Mon April 15, 2013
Shots - Health News

Supreme Court Asks: Can Human Genes Be Patented?

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 7:45 am

Artist's representation of DNA.
iStockphoto.com

Same-sex marriage got huge headlines at the Supreme Court last month, but in the world of science and medicine, the case being argued on Monday is far more important. The lawsuit deals with a truly 21st century issue — whether human genes may be patented.

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1:25am

Mon April 15, 2013
Around the Nation

Tax Day Is This Statue Of Liberty's Last Day Of Work

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:28 pm

Robert Oliver, 27, dances on the corner of 28th and Crenshaw in west Los Angeles, dressed in a Statue of Liberty costume outside the offices of Liberty Income Tax.
David Gilkey NPR

The intersection of Crenshaw Boulevard and 28th Street looks like a lot of intersections in Los Angeles: There's a Taco Bell on one corner and a strip mall with a liquor store and a Liberty Tax Service office on the other. And out in front, as traffic speeds by, 27-year-old Robert Oliver is hard at work — dancing.

"So, chest movements like this, this is called bucking," he says. His chest bounces to the beat. His Bluetooth headphones are on. And his feet glide across the hot sidewalk like he's on ice. "I come up in here and I go down, and that's called a kill-off."

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8:44pm

Sun April 14, 2013
It's All Politics

Labor Nominee's Civil Rights Work Draws Praise, Controversy

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 12:28 pm

Tom Perez, President Obama's nominee to lead the Labor Department, has been an aggressive advocate for civil rights.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

President Obama's nominee to lead the Labor Department has been one of the most aggressive advocates for civil rights in decades. Tom Perez prosecuted a record number of hate crimes cases and extracted huge settlements from banks that overcharged minorities for home loans.

But some Republican lawmakers say those same qualities give them pause about voting to confirm Perez as a Cabinet member.

'Making A Huge Difference'

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6:26pm

Sun April 14, 2013
Music Interviews

Nick Drake's Producer Remembers 'A Real Musician's Musician'

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 10:33 pm

The cover photo from Nick Drake's 1969 debut, Five Leaves Left, produced by Joe Boyd.
Album cover

English folk musician Nick Drake died decades before the song "Pink Moon" found him a wide audience, thanks to a series of Volkswagen ads back in 1999. They sparked a resurgence of interest in Drake's work — music largely ignored in his day but now inspiring legions of young musicians.

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