1:29pm

Fri April 5, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Coughing And The Meaning Of Art

Musical instruments wait for the arrival of the orchestra during the closing session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 12.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

A few years back, I attended a Keith Jarrett solo piano recital at Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco. The hall, which seats nearly 3,000 people, was sold out.

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1:15pm

Fri April 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Pope Francis Calls For 'Decisive Action' On Clerical Sex Abuse

Pope Francis greets the faithful on March 31, 2013 in Vatican City.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Pope Francis told his staff to take "decisive action" when it comes to cases of clerical sex abuse of minors.

In a statement, the Vatican said the pontiff ordered the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith to "act decisively as far as cases of sexual abuse are concerned, promoting, above all, measures to protect minors, help for those who have suffered such violence in the past (and) the necessary procedures against those who are guilty."

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12:48pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Lead In Soil May Be An Overlooked Threat To Kids' Health

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:43 pm

Industrial cities like Detroit have high levels of lead in the aging housing stock and in soils. Researchers found that the amount of soil lead in Detroit that gets suspended in the air correlated with the levels of lead in kids' blood.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Lead poisoning in kids is hardly the problem it used to be, now that we've stopped using lead in house paints and gasoline. But the lead that lingers outside and in old homes is still dangerous if kids are exposed to it.

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12:38pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Top Stories

Tennessee Senate Hosts "Geography of Hate" Projects

Credit mtsu.edu

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  --  Student projects that show the  geographic distribution of hate groups found here in Tennessee will be on display in the capital building next week.

Middle Tennessee State University’s Dr. Patricia Boda asked students in her cartography class to create maps for a project she entitled the “Geography of Hate.”

One student created maps detailing the forced eviction of Native Americans from their ancestral lands in the 1830s Trail of Tears exodus. Others focused on the Holocaust and more recent instances of genocide in Sudan and Rawanda.

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12:01pm

Fri April 5, 2013
Economy

Jobs Report: 'Ouch!'

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we will speak with a Christian leader who's led his church to rethink both its politics and its worship. It's the Reverend Cecil Williams of San Francisco's Glide Memorial Church. He and his wife, who's also a church leader, will join us for a Faith Matters conversation in a few minutes.

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11:42am

Fri April 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Puzzling, Shaky Start To New Round Of Iran Talks

The negotiating table in Almaty, Kazakhstan, where the U.S. and other nations are talking with Iran about that nation's nuclear ambitions.
Ilyas Omarov AFP/Getty Images

The first day of the latest talks between Iran and the so-called P5+1 group about the Persian nation's nuclear ambitions has ended with reports of a "shaky" start and Western diplomats saying they are puzzled by what Iran brought to the table.

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11:14am

Fri April 5, 2013
Barbershop

Rutgers Coach Firing: Have We Gotten Too Soft?

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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10:04am

Fri April 5, 2013
The Salt

Freezing Food Doesn't Kill E. Coli And Other Germs

The NPR Science Desk freezer: now we know we can't presume it's germ-free.
Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Think that freezing food kills E. coli and other nasty microbes? Think again.

That's the lesson from the new E. coli outbreak caused by frozen chicken quesadillas and other snacks that has sickened 24 people in 15 states.

Freezing does slow down the microbes that cause food to spoil, but it's pretty much useless for killing dangerous bugs.

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9:43am

Fri April 5, 2013
Economy

U.S. Job Growth Slows As Jobless Face Benefit Cuts

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 3:55 pm

Applicants complete forms at a job fair in Newark, N.J. Weak U.S. job growth comes at the same time benefits for the long-term unemployed are shrinking.
Mark Lennihan AP

The 11.7 million Americans searching for work got discouraging news Friday morning when the Labor Department said employers created only 88,000 jobs in March. The weak job growth comes at the same time benefits for the long-term unemployed are shrinking.

The smaller-than-expected increase in payrolls was a big disappointment, coming after a long stretch of much better results. Over the past year, employment growth has averaged 169,000 jobs a month.

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9:37am

Fri April 5, 2013
Shots - Health News

Federal Judge Strikes Down Restrictions On Morning-After Pill

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 2:01 pm

Plan B is one of two emergency contraceptives available in the U.S.
UPI/Landov

A federal judge in Brooklyn, N.Y., has ruled that the morning-after pill for emergency contraception must be made available over the counter to girls 16 and under.

The ruling could end a more than decade-long battle over how easy or difficult it should be for teenage girls to obtain emergency contraception. The ruling would also make it easier for older women to obtain the drug because it wouldn't have to be kept behind drugstore counters anymore.

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