4:13pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Around the Nation

Fair Or Foul? Pigeon Shoots Ruffle Feathers In Pennsylvania

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 4:49 pm

A sportsman participates in a pigeon shoot in Pennsylvania in 2009. Animal-rights activists want to ban the tradition in the state.
The Humane Society of the United States

Animal-rights activists are hoping for change in Pennsylvania, where they're fighting to end a tradition: live pigeon shoots. At the events, shooters compete to hit birds that are launched into the air.

Elissa Katz remembers feeling helpless at the site of a pigeon shoot, with feathers flying through the air and wounded birds falling to the ground. "They flutter up in the air as they are sprung from boxes. Shooters have shotguns, they are at fairly close range, and they blast away at the birds," she says.

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4:11pm

Thu April 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Report: Democrat Says Liberal Kentucky SuperPAC Behind McConnell Recording

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 4:40 pm

A Democrat on the committee of the Jefferson County (Kentucky) Democratic Party says a liberal SuperPAC was responsible for surreptitiously recording a strategy session between Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and some of his campaign aides.

As Mark reported on Tuesday, a McConnell aide is heard saying that actress Ashley Judd, who mulled a run against McConnell, was "emotionally unbalanced."

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3:18pm

Thu April 11, 2013
All Tech Considered

A Mile-High Hack: An App That Could Remotely Hijack Planes

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 10:28 am

A German IT consultant's proof-of-concept software raises questions about efforts to secure global flight systems.
iStockphoto.com

The Federal Aviation Administration continues work on its multibillion-dollar upgrade to the nation's air traffic control system, but it may not be enough to stop hackers from taking control of airplanes with a smartphone.

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3:17pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Space

Origin Of 'Mercury' Meteorite Still Puzzles Scientists

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 7:18 am

Several fragments of this unusual rock were discovered last year in Morocco. It's been hailed as the first meteorite from the planet Mercury, but where it came from in the solar system isn't certain.
Stefan Ralew

A strange green rock discovered in Morocco last year was hailed by the press as the first meteorite from Mercury. But scientists who've been puzzling over the stone ever since say the accumulating evidence may point in a different direction. Maybe, just maybe, they say, the 4.56-billion-year-old rock fell to Earth from the asteroid belt located between Mars and Jupiter.

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3:17pm

Thu April 11, 2013
The Salt

A Legal Twist In The Effort To Ban Cameras From Livestock Plants

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 3:38 pm

Cows wait to be milked at a California dairy farm.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

For years, undercover videos documenting animal cruelty at farms and slaughterhouses have cast the nation's meat and dairy farmers in a grim light.

In response, the livestock industry supported legislative efforts in multiple states designed to keep cameras from recording without permission in livestock plants. The Salt reported on these efforts, which activists call "ag gag" bills, last year.

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3:11pm

Thu April 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Price Tag On Cyprus Bailout Goes Up

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:08 pm

It's going to cost more to bail out Cyprus than originally projected, with officials now saying the cost will be $30 billion instead of the original estimate of $23 billion.

"It's a fact the memorandum of November talked about 17.5 billion [euros] in financing needs. And it has emerged this figure has become 23 billion [euros]," government spokesman Christos Stylianides was quoted by the BBC as saying on Thursday.

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3:09pm

Thu April 11, 2013
It's All Politics

On Message: Who Wants To Cut Social Security?

A sign outside the White House on Tuesday protests part of President Obama's proposed federal budget.
Kevin G. Hall MCT/Landov

The president's $3.77 trillion fiscal 2014 budget plan is expansive. But the part getting the most attention is his proposal to change the way the government calculates inflation using a measure known in economics-speak as chained CPI.

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2:20pm

Thu April 11, 2013
The Two-Way

On Cuba Trip, Jay-Z Responds To Washington With Verse

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 7:14 am

U.S. singer Beyonce and her husband, rapper Jay-Z, right, tours Old Havana as a body guard, left, and tour guide, right, accompany them in Cuba on Thursday, April 4.
Ramon Espinosa AP

This week, Washington took on hip-hop royalty, when two Florida representatives went after Jay-Z and Beyonce for their recent trip to Cuba.

"We're saying that no one is above the law, even if you are the diva Beyoncé, and that's wonderful that she's famous and rich, and Jay-Z, everybody loves him, too. Terrific. But no one's above the law," Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen told CNN.

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2:17pm

Thu April 11, 2013
The Two-Way

'Just Another Provocation,' Says Argentina About Thatcher Funeral Snub

Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez.
Javier Soriano AFP/Getty Images

Argentina is shrugging off Britain's decision to leave President Cristina Fernandez off the guest list for the funeral of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

"What do I care if I'm not invivted somewhere I never intended to go," Argentina's Foreign Minister Héctor Timerman told Radio Del Plata. "It's just another provocation."

But he also added: "The woman has died; let the family mourn her in peace."

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2:15pm

Thu April 11, 2013
Asia

A Symbol Of Korean Cooperation Becomes A Political Casualty

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 7:33 pm

A South Korean soldier patrols as vehicles returning from the jointly run Kaesong industrial complex in North Korea arrive at a checkpoint in Paju, north of Seoul, on April 6.
Lee Jae-Won Reuters/Landov

This week, North Korea closed off the last avenue of economic cooperation with its rival, South Korea. Pyongyang says the closing of Kaesong — a joint North-South industrial complex — is temporary.

But the move is a big symbolic blow on the Korean peninsula and a potential disaster for some of the South Korean businesses that have invested there.

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