2:07pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Latin America

Three Decades On, Ex-Guatemalan Leader Faces Genocide Charges

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 8:44 pm

Guatemala's former dictator Efrain Rios Montt arrives in court Jan. 31 in Guatemala City to stand trial on genocide charges. On Tuesday, the prosecution will present its case in the trial.
Moises Castillo AP

In a Guatemalan courtroom Tuesday, prosecutors will present their case against a former military dictator who ruled during one of the bloodiest periods in the Central American nation's 36-year civil war.

Efrain Rios Montt is accused of genocide in the murder of tens of thousands of Guatemala's Indians. Human rights advocates and the families of victims have struggled for years to bring him before the court, and they say it is the first trial in Latin America of a former president in the country where he ruled.

Read more

1:15pm

Mon March 18, 2013
It's All Politics

Republicans' Secret To Success? Sound And Act More Like Democrats

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 6:17 pm

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Monday.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Updated at 3:40 p.m. ET

If Republicans hope to recapture the White House in the foreseeable future, they basically need to sound and campaign more like Democrats.

Read more

1:08pm

Mon March 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Indonesian Zoo Breeds Rare Komodo Dragons

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 1:26 pm

Four of seven baby Komodos born at the Surabaya Zoo in Indonesia last week.
AFP/Getty Images

A zoo in Indonesia is now home to seven bouncing baby Komodo dragons. Before you recoil in disgust, have a look at this video from the BBC — "cute" may not be the operative word, but the hatchlings do exude a certain endearing quality.

Read more

1:06pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Politics

Tenn. Student Soldiers Hit by Federal Budget Impasse

Vistors try out the new indoor ROTC firing range simulator on the MTSU campus in early February.
Credit mtsunews.com

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. --  Tennessee’s student soldiers and the universities they attend are facing a loss of tuition assistance as a result of the ongoing federal budget impasse in Washington.

Hundreds of Tennessee Army National Guardsmen are scrambling to find the money to stay in school after the federal tuition assistance program they relied on was discontinued March 8.

Read more

12:58pm

Mon March 18, 2013
The Salt

Some People Really Can Taste The Rainbow

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 10:23 am

A select group of synesthetes can truly "taste the rainbow."
Photo illustration by Daniel M.N. Turner NPR

Plenty of us got our fill of green-colored food on St. Patrick's Day. (Green beer, anyone?) But for some people, associating taste with color is more than just a once-a-year experience.

Read more

12:43pm

Mon March 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Steve Davis, Oklahoma Star QB In The '70s, Killed In Crash Of Small Plane

Oklahoma quarterback Steve Davis, left, and coach Barry Switzer celebrate the team's No. 1 ranking after the Orange Bowl in 1976. Davis, 60, died Sunday in the crash of a small plane. Switzer called Davis a "great role model for young people."
AP

One of the two men killed Sunday when a small plane crashed into a house near South Bend, Ind., was former University of Oklahoma star quarterback Steve Davis, the St. Joseph County (Ind.) coroner's office says.

Read more

12:29pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Shots - Health News

Worried Parents Balk At HPV Vaccine For Daughters

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:35 am

Lauren Fant winces as she receives her third and final shot of HPV vaccine from nurse Stephanie Pearson in Marietta, Ga., in 2007.
John Amis AP

More parents are worried about getting their daughters vaccinated against cervical cancer, despite more doctors saying the shots are a good idea.

Read more

12:23pm

Mon March 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Supreme Court Lets $222,000 Verdict In File-Sharing Case Stand

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 2:01 pm

Jammie Thomas-Rasset of Brainerd, Minn., in 2007.
Julia Cheng AP

The first person to challenge a file-sharing lawsuit brought by the Recording Industry Association of America has reached the end of the line.

Without comment, the Supreme Court refused to hear Jammie Thomas-Rasset's appeal, which means the $222,000 verdict against her stands.

Thomas-Rasset was convicted of sharing 24 songs on the peer-to-peer service Kazaa. She was arguing that the amount in question was excessive.

Read more

12:21pm

Mon March 18, 2013
Sports

MTSU Faces St. Mary's in First NCAA Appearance in 24 Years

Credit goblueraiders.com

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (BEASLEY)  --  Mid-State sports fans have even more reason to celebrate the start of March Madness.  Two local schools will play in the NCAA tournament.

For the first time in 24 years, the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders are returning to the NCAA. Middle Tennessee is set to face Saint Mary’s as an eleven seed Tuesday in Dayton, Ohio with a tip off time of 8:10 p.m.

Read more

12:12pm

Mon March 18, 2013
The Picture Show

10 Years Ago, A Night Vision Of The Iraq Invasion

Originally published on Mon March 18, 2013 12:14 pm

A soldier with the U.S. Army's 3rd Infantry Division on March 20, 2003, among the first troops to set foot in Iraq in that year's invasion.
David P. Gilkey Detroit Free Press/MCT

Ten years ago this week, U.S. troops invaded Iraq. NPR's David Gilkey was there and shares his memory of a photograph he made that first night.

The photos that David Gilkey took the night of the Iraq invasion were among the first pictures of U.S. troops in combat to come out of Iraq. And among the images he captured was one of a soldier running through an abandoned Iraqi army post that had, just minutes before, been hit by U.S. rocket fire.

Those photos would not have been possible without a night vision optic for his camera.

Read more

Pages