10:08am

Thu March 14, 2013
On Aging

An Age-Old Problem: Who Is 'Elderly'?

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 12:51 pm

When exactly does someone become elderly?

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10:01am

Thu March 14, 2013
The Salt

It's Russian Mardi Gras: Time For Pancakes, Butter And Fistfights

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 12:36 pm

A man dressed as a skomorokh, a medieval East Slavic harlequin, distributes bliny in St. Petersburg, Russia, during the last day of Maslenitsa, March 1, 2009.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Nothing says party like pancakes and butter. At least, not if you happen to be in Russia this week.

The country is in the midst of celebrating Maslenitsa, an Eastern Slavic folk holiday that takes place the week before the start of Russian Orthodox Lent (this year, it starts March 18). Though now tied to the Christian calendar, Maslenitsa has roots in ancient Slavic sun worshippers — it originally marked the end of winter and advent of spring. And, like Mardi Gras, it involves a whole lot of feasting before the Lenten fast — with blinis, a Russian pancake, as the food of choice.

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9:51am

Thu March 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Co-Founder Of Khmer Rouge Dies; Ieng Sary Escapes Judgment For Genocide

Ieng Sary.
Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

The death of Ieng Sary, co-founder of the Khmer Rouge that ruled Cambodia from 1975 to 1979 and killed an estimated 1.7 million of that nation's people in the process, has dashed the hopes "among survivors and court prosecutors that he would ever be punished for his alleged war crimes," The Associated Press writes.

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9:38am

Thu March 14, 2013
Book Reviews

Monsters, Myths And Poetic License In Anne Carson's 'Red Doc'

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 5:42 pm

Anne Carson's newest book is called Red Doc>.
Peter Smith

You don't read poetry. That's fine. Nobody does anymore. I'm not going to make you feel bad about that. But if there is one book I've pressed on more people in the past decade, it is Anne Carson's Autobiography of Red. And I'm here to tell you its sequel has just been published, and that it's pretty much the biggest event of the year.

Autobiography of Red was a novel written in verse, a crossbreed of poetry and prose that retold the myth of Geryon and Herakles, aka Hercules.

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9:36am

Thu March 14, 2013
Shots - Health News

Neurologists Warn Against ADHD Drugs To Help Kids Study

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:48 am

Ten milligram tablets of the prescription drug Adderall. The drug is used to treat ADHD and is used by some students to boost their academic performance.
Jb Reed Bloomberg via Getty Images

Adderall and other ADHD medications are among the most prescribed drugs in America.

Quite a few of those pills don't end up being used to treat ADHD, though. They're used as "smart drugs" or "study drugs" by students who find the pills give them a mental edge.

The American Academy of Neurology now says: Stop that.

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9:28am

Thu March 14, 2013
Business

Running On Empty: MTSU Researcher Ricketts’ Coast-to-Coast Drive Using No Gas Ends March 14

Driving though Memphis

Middle Tennessee State University alternative fuels researcher Dr. Cliff Ricketts sits behind the wheel of a car knowing full well that he is less than 24 hours from achieving a career goal.

Should all go as planned, Ricketts a longtime agriculture faculty member and 35-year alternative fuels researcher, will complete a 2,600-mile journey without using any gasoline. It’s possible he may be the first person ever to achieve this feat. Follow on Twitter @WeilerRandy.

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9:18am

Thu March 14, 2013
Asia

Why North Korea Makes Everyone Nervous ... Except Dennis Rodman

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 12:58 pm

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un rides on a boat near the sea border with South Korea in this March 11 photo released by the Korean Central News Agency. Bellicose rhetoric from North Korea has put other countries in the region on edge.
KCNA AP

North Korea's nuclear chest-beating has achieved the seemingly impossible by aligning the concerns of South Korea, Japan and even China, three Asian neighbors that have a long history of strained ties.

While all those countries have separate aims and interests, they share with the United States a mutual interest in containing the North Korean regime, restraining its rhetoric and keeping Pyongyang's nuclear option in a box, says Richard Bush III, the director of the Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution.

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9:03am

Thu March 14, 2013
The Two-Way

'God Particle' Update: Scientists Think They've Pinned Down The Higgs Boson

This is what researchers at the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider expect a Higgs boson to look like. The Higgs boson is the subatomic particle that scientists say gives everything in the universe mass.
ATLAS Experiment/CERN

"Scientists working with data from a large particle accelerator in Europe are now almost certain they have pinned down the elusive sub-atomic particle known as the Higgs Boson," NPR's Joe Palca tells our Newscast Desk.

Or, as it's also known, the "God Particle" (more on that moniker below).

Joe reports that:

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8:43am

Thu March 14, 2013
It's All Politics

Will CPAC Tell Us Which Way The GOP Is Headed?

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 12:36 pm

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul filibusters John Brennan's nomination as CIA director last week. Paul is scheduled to speak Thursday at CPAC.
AP

Which way the Republican Party?

In the hope of getting answers to that and other questions, many activists, party big wigs and political journalists have descended on a hotel in a Washington suburb to attend the Conservative Political Action Conference, which started Thursday.

This annual CPAC gathering is the first since President Obama thwarted Republican efforts to retake the White House, a defeat of Mitt Romney that many in the GOP didn't see coming.

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8:34am

Thu March 14, 2013
U.S.

Crime Lab Scandal Leaves Mass. Legal System In Turmoil

Originally published on Sat March 16, 2013 8:26 am

Annie Dookan, a former Massachusetts crime lab chemist, is accused of falsifying evidence in as many as 34,000 cases. The state's criminal justice system is now reeling as former defendants are challenging their convictions and hundreds have already been released.
Jessica Rinaldi Reuters/Landov

A scandal in a Massachusetts crime lab continues to reverberate throughout the state's legal system. Several months ago, Annie Dookhan, a former chemist in a state crime lab, told police that she messed up big time. Dookhan now stands accused of falsifying test results in as many as 34,000 cases.

As a result, lawyers, prosecutors and judges used to operating in a world of "beyond a reasonable doubt" now have nothing but doubt.

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