11:49am

Tue November 13, 2012
The Two-Way

'Washington Post' Editor Steps Down; 'Boston Globe' Editor To Fill Job

Jonathan Ernst Reuters /Landov

The Washington Post just announced that executive editor Marcus Brauchli is leaving that position to "become vice president of The Washington Post Company with responsibility for evaluating new media opportunities."

His successor has already been hired: Martin Baron, editor of the Boston Globe, will move to the Post on Jan. 2.

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11:40am

Tue November 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Motor Trend Names Tesla S Car Of The Year, First Electric Car To Receive Honor

Model S Alpha, in black, and the Telsa Roadster behind it.
James Lipman Telsa

Motor Trend named Tesla's Model S as its Car of the Year. It is the first time in the award's 64-year history the honor goes to a car without an internal combustion engine.

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11:12am

Tue November 13, 2012
The Salt

Adventurous Eating Helped Human Ancestors Boost Odds Of Survival

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:38 am

The first prehistoric chef who looked out at a field of grass in Africa and said, "dinner!" may have helped our ancestors use new resources in new locations.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

Picture, if you can, a prehistoric Bobby Flay — an inventive 3 million-year-old version of the Food Network star chef. He's struggling to liven up yet another salad of herbs and twigs when inspiration strikes. "We've got grass here, and sedge," he says. "Grass and sedge, that's what this dish needs!"

His pals take a tentative taste of this nouvelle cuisine. Sedges usually aren't considered gourmet fare, after all, by these human ancestors. They're tough grasslike plants that grow in marshes. But wow! Not only is this a new taste sensation, it's found in many places.

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10:06am

Tue November 13, 2012
Food

Cook Anupy Singla Dishes On Her Diwali Table

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 11:03 am

Hindus from New Jersey to New Delhi are celebrating Diwali. The holiday has its own traditions, customs, and most importantly, food. Host Michel Martin speaks with writer and cookbook author Anupy Singla about the dishes she's bringing to the table for this year's Diwali celebration.

10:06am

Tue November 13, 2012
Your Money

Alternative Minimum Tax And Your Bottom Line

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 12:31 pm

If the government goes over the "fiscal cliff," millions of households could see tax increases because of an obscure part of the tax code, known as the alternative minimum tax. Host Michel Martin talks with NPR Business Editor Marilyn Geewax about exactly what could happen and who would be affected.

10:06am

Tue November 13, 2012
The Second Term

Tea Party Assessing Damage From Election 2012?

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 11:00 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. Coming up, we're hearing a lot about the so-called fiscal cliff: those automatic spending cuts and tax hikes that will take effect if lawmakers and the White House don't come up with a deficit reduction plan by the end of the year. We're going to focus on a tax hike that may hit many more people than you might think. We'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

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10:06am

Tue November 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Cleveland's Convicted Idiot Finishes Punishment; Says She's Learned Lesson

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 9:50 am

On Wednesday, Shena Hardin  held her sign of shame higher — as the judge said she should.
Marvin Fong The Plain Dealer /Landov

Update at 9 a.m. ET, Nov. 14: "It's A Learning Lesson ... I'll Move Forward."

Shena Hardin, the Cleveland woman ordered to stand on a street corner with a sign saying she was in idiot for driving on a sidewalk to get past a stopped school bus, finished that two-day punishment this morning and issued a statement saying she's learned a lesson.

As Cleveland's 19ActionNews reports, Hardin:

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9:21am

Tue November 13, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Death, But Softly

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:35 pm

Michel de Montaigne
Wikimedia Commons

It was 1569, or maybe early 1570, when it happened: A young French gentleman was out for a ride with his workers, all of them on horseback, when suddenly, "like a thunderbolt," he felt something thick and fleshy slam him from behind. (It was an overzealous, galloping assistant who couldn't stop in time.) Michel de Montaigne's horse crumbled, he went flying up, then down, he crashed to the ground. Then things went black.

When he came to, a minute or so later, he says,

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9:12am

Tue November 13, 2012
The Two-Way

Second General Getting Snared In Petraeus Scandal Is 'Mind-Boggling'

Originally published on Tue November 13, 2012 3:36 pm

Marine Gen. John Allen.
Alex Wong Getty Images
  • NPR's Tom Bowman and Carrie Johnson, on 'Morning Edition'

Update at 11:30 a.m. ET: The Associated Press just moved a "bulletin" saying that according to a "senior defense official" the emails between Gen. John Allen and Jill Kelley were "flirtatious."

Update at 4:33 p.m. ET: NPR's Tom Bowman reports that U.S. officials tell him Paula Broadwell sent Gen. Allen messages warning him about Kelley. Allen, in turn, warned Kelley about those messages.

Our original post:

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8:59am

Tue November 13, 2012
Politics

Questions About Election Day Voting Irregularities

Credit State of Tennessee

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A coalition of Nashville poll watchers wants an audit of problems they documented with Election Day voting.

Mary Mancini is the director of Tennessee Citizen Action, which organized the poll watching effort. She says that the coalition command center fielded over 600 calls on Election Day.

Problems included too few poll workers, workers who gave voters inaccurate information and polling places that ran out of provisional ballots and change-of-address forms.

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