3:30pm

Wed November 14, 2012
It's All Politics

Maine Independent Angus King To Caucus With Senate Democrats

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 3:54 pm

Sen.-elect Angus King of Maine (far right) joins newly elected Democratic senators and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. From left: Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Tim Kaine of Virginia, Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, Reid, and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.
Harry Hamburg AP

Sen.-elect Angus King of Maine, who cruised to victory last week running as an independent, said Wednesday that he will caucus with Senate Democrats.

King's announcement means the Democrats will have in essence a 55-45 seat advantage in the Senate next year.

The Senate's other independent, Bernie Sanders of Vermont, also caucuses with the Democrats.

King was elected last week to replace the retiring moderate Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe.

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2:56pm

Wed November 14, 2012
National Security

The Petraeus Affair: From First Meeting To Full-Blown Scandal

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 4:12 pm

New details are emerging about how David Petraeus' extramarital affair developed, and when officials — from law enforcement to the White House — first found out about it. Track the story with this interactive timeline, compiled through some digging by The Associated Press and NPR.

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2:33pm

Wed November 14, 2012
Planet Money

Sandy's Shadow, In Three Small Businesses

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 5:59 pm

Howard Beach, Queens. October 30, 2012.
Pam Andrade Flickr

Retail sales fell in October, for the first time in several months. Analysts largely blamed the hurricane. If they're right, sales will bounce back this month and the economic recovery will continue (slowly, slowly).

That's the big picture. To get a sense of the small picture — messier, more ambiguous — I visited three small businesses on Cross Bay Boulevard, in Howard Beach, Queens. The storm swept in here and flooded the neighborhood.

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1:47pm

Wed November 14, 2012
National Security

What's The Punishment For Adultery These Days?

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 9:35 am

Dwight Eisenhower allegedly had an affair with his female driver while he was the supreme Allied commander during World War II. He's shown here at the wheel of his jeep in France in 1944.
AP

A half-century ago, President John Kennedy could count on the press to be part of a conspiracy of silence when it came to his marital infidelities.

Today, as the David Petraeus case illustrates, it's a mad dash to see who can publish the latest salacious details when a famous, rich or powerful person is publicly entangled in an affair.

There's no rewinding the clock when it comes to exposing private indiscretions of public figures. But what are the ground rules these days when it comes to punishment and redemption?

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1:18pm

Wed November 14, 2012
World

U.S. Rethinks Security As Mideast Oil Imports Drop

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 6:00 pm

A U.S. Marine patrol walks across the charred oil landscape near a burning well near Kuwait City in March 1991. Concerns about oil supply were at play when the U.S. and its allies intervened during the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990. But American policy is changing now that Mideast oil imports to the U.S. are declining.
John Gaps III AP

Within the next two decades, the United States may barely need any oil from the Persian Gulf, due in large part to increased domestic production. That dramatic shift could shake the foundation of U.S. interests in the Middle East.

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12:28pm

Wed November 14, 2012
Shots - Health News

Signs Of Drug-Resistant Malaria Emerge In Vietnam And Myanmar

Health workers take a blood sample from an infant to test for the malaria at a clinic along the border between Thailand and Myanmar.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

Last spring, the global health community got some alarming news about its last, best treatment for malaria. The artemisinin-based drugs were losing their potency at two different places in Southeast Asia: in western Cambodia and along the border between Thailand and Myanmar.

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12:23pm

Wed November 14, 2012
The Two-Way

Protests, Strikes Spread Across Europe In Opposition To Austerity Measures

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 1:32 pm

Riot policemen arrest a protester in Valencia on Wednesday during a general strike .
Jose Jordan AFP/Getty Images

From Spain and Portugal to Greece and Italy and on north to Belgium and Germany, strikes and protests spread across Europe today.

While this is the first time that the protests have gone pan-European, the message hasn't changed: Demonstrators were protesting the austerity measures put in place by many European countries to bring an end to the sovereign debt crisis that has dogged the continent.

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12:22pm

Wed November 14, 2012
The Two-Way

Live Blog: President Obama's News Conference

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:44 pm

President Obama during his news conference at the White House today.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images
  • Listen to NPR Coverage of the News Conference

Eight days after his re-election — with the fiscal cliff looming, questions being raised about the deadly attack on the U.S.

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11:39am

Wed November 14, 2012
The Two-Way

Pelosi Chides Luke Russert Over Question About Young Leadership

House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) gathers around female House Democrats during a news conference on Wednesday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

There was a bit of laughter but also a lot of seriousness, when NBC's Luke Russert asked Rep. Nancy Pelosi if her decision to seek the House minority leadership again prevents a younger leadership from taking her place.

Pelosi was flanked by the Democratic female members of House and as soon as the question flew out of Russert's mouth, groans filled the room. "Age discrimination," one person was heard screaming.

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11:15am

Wed November 14, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama's Political Moneyball Could Be The Shape Of Campaigns To Come

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 1:36 pm

Democratic party volunteer Matt Lattanzi worked door to door for the Obama campaign while canvassing in a Youngstown, Ohio, apartment building on Oct. 28.
John Moore Getty Images

A good deal of credit for President Obama's re-election has gone to his campaign's sophistication at interpreting data about potential voters and its use of behavioral research to get supporters to actually vote.

And because success in politics spawns imitators, the approach could well shape how future campaigns are run.

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