3:32pm

Thu November 1, 2012
The Salt

Tuna Noodle Casserole, A Hot Dish In Need Of An Update, Gets One

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 6:19 pm

Classic tuna noodle casserole is an often maligned yet much beloved hot dish.
iStockphoto.com

Desperation, laziness, overwhelming craving: I say these are three conditions that drive a person to make a tuna noodle casserole.

The desperation? A cupboard bare except for those nonperishable standards: pasta, a can of tuna and a can of cream of mushroom soup. Our friends along the Northeast Seaboard probably know what we're talking about right now.

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3:00pm

Thu November 1, 2012
It's All Politics

What Romney's Run Means For Mormonism

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 9:59 pm

The Mormon Salt Lake temple in Salt Lake City.
George Frey Getty Images

Win or lose on Election Day, Republican Mitt Romney has already made history as the first Mormon to win a major party presidential nomination.

But has his race for the White House changed Americans' perceptions and stereotypes of the small, insular but fast-growing religion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?

And, by extension, has Romney affected how Mormons view their place in the nation?

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2:52pm

Thu November 1, 2012
The Two-Way

In Sandy's Wake, New Yorkers Don't Sweat Small Stuff

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 3:05 pm

People wait to charge cellphones and laptops Thursday at a generator set up in the West Village. Superstorm Sandy left large parts of New York City without power.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

NPR's Margot Adler is covering the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in New York.

I walked out of my apartment at 5 this morning in a part of Manhattan -– the Upper West Side — that never lost power. Still, I skirted around downed trees on my way to the subway. Across the street, a car was crushed by a tree. Almost no one was on the street.

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2:44pm

Thu November 1, 2012
Shots - Health News

Researchers Say Drug Subsidies Led To Overtreatment Of Malaria In Africa

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 12:23 pm

Blood samples dry during malaria screening. Public health workers call for more malaria testing in Africa to stop costly drugs from being handed out to kids with pneumonia.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

There's a hot debate in global health right now. And the stakes are high.

This month the Global Fund will vote to continue or scrap a $225 million project that subsidizes the cost of the most effective malaria drugs in seven African countries.

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2:41pm

Thu November 1, 2012
The Two-Way

Mayor Bloomberg Endorses Obama, Citing Climate Change, Gay Marriage

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks to members of the media Oct. 28 in New York City.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

The independent mayor of New York City, Michael Bloomberg, has just endorsed President Barack Obama for president of United States.

Bloomberg opened his editorial in Bloomberg View by saying his decision was affected by the effect Superstorm Sandy had on New York City. The country, he said, needs a leader who will tackle these issues.

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2:19pm

Thu November 1, 2012
The Two-Way

University Of Alabama Names First Woman President

Judy Bonner, the University of Alabama's new president, when the school's championship football team visted the White House in April.
Mike Theiler UPI /Landov

For the first time in the school's 181-year history, the University of Alabama has named a woman to be its permanent president.

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2:05pm

Thu November 1, 2012
The Salt

Sandy's Damage Under The Sea, Through The Eyes Of Oyster Farmers

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 2:09 pm

What they pull up is discouraging. Normally, 30 seconds under water would bring up a cage full of mostly healthy oysters. This time, Jimmy Bloom pulls up a cage that is barely one-third full. And it's haul is a mix of broken, chipped, meatless oysters.
Jeff Cohen for NPR

Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy wrapped up a post Hurricane Sandy news briefing earlier this week by talking about sewage discharges into Long Island Sound. "Suffice to say in the immediate time being, no one should eat the clams or oysters," he said.

That's right. Because of water quality issues, the state put a temporary stop to oyster farming, but that's usually a short-term thing and it happens fairly regularly after a big storm.

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12:36pm

Thu November 1, 2012
It's All Politics

If Presidential Election Held Today, Clint Would Beat Oprah

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 2:12 pm

A life-sized cardboard cutout of actor, director and politician Clint Eastwood stands next to an empty chair cutout north of Los Angeles, California. Eastwood's 12-minute conversation with an empty chair representing President Obama sparked much attention at the 2012 Republican National Convention.
David McNew Getty Images

File this under "I didn't really think there was anything else I could learn about or care about swing state voters, and then came this."

Swing state voters by 42-38 percent would prefer a President Clint Eastwood over a President Oprah Winfrey.

Republican swing state voters would prefer President Stephen Colbert over President Jon Stewart by a 3-to-1 margin. Flip that for swing state Democrats.

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12:31pm

Thu November 1, 2012
It's All Politics

Obama Returns To The Post-Sandy Campaign Trail

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 1:49 pm

President Obama campaigns Thursday in Green Bay, Wis.
Tom Lynn AP

Just five days before Election Day, President Obama returned to the campaign trail after spending several days preoccupied with overseeing the federal response to the devastation in the Northeast in the wake of Superstorm Sandy.

Obama began his campaign re-emergence Thursday with a rally in Green Bay, Wis., a state where his once-substantial lead in polls over Republican Mitt Romney has narrowed to only a few points in a majority of the polls.

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12:28pm

Thu November 1, 2012
The Two-Way

Pay Phones Are Suddenly Important Again Because Of Sandy

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 1:24 pm

A woman uses a pay phone in the Lower East Village in Manhattan on Wednesday.
Carlo Allegri Reuters /Landov

"After Sandy, Wired New Yorkers Get Reconnected With Pay Phones: Coin-Eating Retro Devices Baffle Some, Frustrate Many; Moment Merits a Tweet."

That Wall Street Journal story today, about folks in lower Manhattan who have been forced by the power outages and damages in the wake of Superstorm Sandy to seek out an old-fashioned way to make a call, has struck a chord.

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