1:29pm

Thu October 18, 2012
World

Radio Liberty Going Off The Air In Russia

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:42 am

Police officers detain Kirill Filimonov, one of the supporters of Radio Liberty in Moscow during a recent protest. The service will stop AM radio broadcasts and will become an Internet operation. It can also be heard on short wave radio.
Natalia Kolesnikova AFP/Getty Images

Radio Liberty was founded in the 1950s to broadcast American views into the former Soviet Union when the Cold War was at its peak. Radio Liberty transmitted on short wave, and the Soviet government did all it could to jam the broadcasts.

But after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russian President Boris Yeltsin granted the service permission to open a Moscow bureau and broadcast within the country on AM radio.

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1:13pm

Thu October 18, 2012
It's All Politics

A Watch Party In China For The U.S. Presidential Debate

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:21 pm

The Shanghai skyline
Feng Li Getty Images

Gathering voters to watch a presidential debate and then evaluate it is a long tradition in American journalism. So, I got to thinking: What would happen if I invited a bunch of interested foreigners — all of them Chinese citizens — to watch the presidential debate from my Shanghai office?

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1:09pm

Thu October 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Google's Stock Drops After Premature Release; 'PendingLarry' Goes Viral

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 2:05 pm

Google CEO Larry Page. What's he going to say now?
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Oops.

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1:06pm

Thu October 18, 2012
The Salt

Evaporated Cane Juice: Sugar In Disguise?

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 6:08 pm

If you look very closely, you'll see "evaporated cane juice" in the ingredients list on this yogurt. A California woman is suing the Chobani yogurt company over its use of the term.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

If you're one of those people who vigilantly checks the ingredient list of the things you buy at the grocery store, you may have already seen this: Some food products now contain something called "evaporated cane juice." It can be found in yogurt, fruit juices and lemonades.

So what exactly is evaporated cane juice? Well, it depends on whom you ask. We spoke with a few folks outside our local grocery store, and many of them were confused. Take a listen:

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12:41pm

Thu October 18, 2012
Shots - Health News

With An Army Of Vaccinators, India Subdues Polio

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 7:31 pm

An Indian child receives the oral polio vaccine. Twice a year, an army of 2 million volunteers fans out across India to administer the vaccine. India has not reported a single case of polio in more than a year-and-a-half.
Julie McCarthy NPR

All this week, we've been examining the world's last remaining pockets of polio, a disease for which there is no cure. India marked a milestone when the World Health Organization struck it from the list of polio-endemic countries in February after no new cases were reported for more than a year. From Delhi, NPR's Julie McCarthy reports on how, despite poverty and poor sanitation, the world's second-most populous country is eradicating the disease.

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11:39am

Thu October 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Winter Outlook: Above Normal Temps In West; Below In Southeast

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 1:12 pm

Jan. 21, 2012: A winter scene in Brooklyn, N.Y. Snow may be a relatively rare sight this coming winter in the U.S.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Here are some of the details from the winter weather forecast released this morning by the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center:

-- There are "enhanced chances for above normal temperatures across most of the western half of the lower 48 states."

-- The Florida peninsula is likely to experience "below-normal temperatures."

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11:29am

Thu October 18, 2012
Shots - Health News

Old Drug Gets A Second Look For TB Fight

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 12:04 pm

Under the microscope, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. The germs that cause TB have become resistant to many drugs.
Janice Haney Carr CDC

A small study offers a bit of cautious optimism about the prospects for treatment of tuberculosis, one of humankind's most ancient scourges.

This week's New England Journal of Medicine has a report showing that adding a 12-year-old antibiotic called linezolid, brand name Zyvox, to existing treatments cured nearly 90 percent of patients with a form of tuberculosis resistant to both first- and second-line antibiotics.

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11:23am

Thu October 18, 2012
Top Stories

Average College Debt More Than $26,000

MTSU senior Sydney Burfitt, left, a liberal studies major who’€™ll graduate in December, speaks to Lori Hagins, a store manager with Shane Co. in Cool Springs, during the Fall Career Fair inside Murphy Center Oct. 10.
MTSU

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP/WMOT) — A new nation-wide report shows two-thirds of the college class of 2011 finished school with loan debt, and those who borrowed walked off the graduation stage owing more than $26,600. That's up about 5 percent from the class before.

The latest figures are calculated in a report by The Institute for College Access and Success (TICAS). The report does not include most graduates of for-profit colleges, who typically borrow more than their counterparts elsewhere.

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11:15am

Thu October 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Mississippi Queen: My Race Wasn't A Factor In Homecoming Title

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 11:21 am

University of Mississippi Homecoming Queen Courtney Pearson, as she was escorted on to the football field last Saturday by her father, Cmdr. Kerry Pearson.
Robert Jordan UM Communications
  • Michel Martin talks with Courtney Pearson

11:14am

Thu October 18, 2012
Top Stories

Casey Anthony Prosecutor to Speak at MTSU

MTSU

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  --  The Florida attorney who prosecuted the Casey Anthony case is in the mid-state to talk about the trial.

State’s Attorney Jeff Ashton will speak Thursday evening at 7 p.m. on the campus of Middle Tennessee State University.

The presentation is part of the MTSU "Legends in Forensic Leadership" series. Ashton is recognized as the first prosecutor to use DNA evidence in the court room as part of a 1978 rape case.

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