6:49am

Fri February 15, 2013
The Two-Way

'Blade Runner' Pistorius In Tears As Murder Charge Is Filed

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 8:32 am

South African Paralympic and Olympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius as he wept today while being charged with murder.
Antoine De Ras EPA /LANDOV

"South African 'Blade Runner' Oscar Pistorius broke down in tears on Friday after he was charged in court with shooting dead his girlfriend in his Pretoria house," Reuters reports from Pretoria.

According to the wire service: "The 26-year-old Olympic and Paralympic superstar stood with head bowed in front of magistrate Desmond Nair to hear the murder charge read out, then started sobbing, covering his face with his hands."

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6:18am

Fri February 15, 2013
The Two-Way

'No Link' Between Meteor That Hurt Hundreds And Asteroid About To Fly By

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 2:40 pm

A meteor's vapor trail above the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia, on Friday.
Vyacheslav Nikulin EPA /LANDOV
  • Sound from the AP: Booms, then breaking glass and car alarms, when the meteor roared in

So, on the day when an asteroid the size of an office building buzzed the planet, there's this unsettling news:

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4:03am

Fri February 15, 2013
The Two-Way

The 27th Victim: Nancy Lanza Is Subject Of 'Frontline' Documentary

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 7:13 pm

Wooden angels memorialize the victims of Adam Lanza's shooting spree in Newtown, Conn., last December. An upcoming Frontline documentary seeks to provide new details about Lanza and his mother, Nancy.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

The lives of the 26 people murdered by Adam Lanza at Sandy Hook Elementary School last December were eulogized and celebrated after the tragedy. But many discussions about Lanza's first victim, his mother, Nancy, were marked by both sympathy and suspicion, particularly as the news emerged that she had taken her son to shooting ranges.

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1:52am

Fri February 15, 2013
Economy

In Kansas, A 'Glide Path' To No Income Taxes. Will It Work?

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 8:47 am

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback, shown delivering the State of the State address last month, is pushing to get rid of the state's income tax, which has some Republicans concerned.
Charlie Riedel AP

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback has put the state on what he calls a "glide path to zero" income tax. But that glide path is far from being clear or smooth.

On the face of it, Brownback seems to enjoy a remarkably strong political position. He's a conservative Republican, flanked by GOP supermajorities in both legislative chambers. His allies helped purge moderate Republicans from the state Senate in last year's election.

"I think the road is open," Brownback says. "I think we do provide an alternative model. I think we do provide a red-state model."

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1:09am

Fri February 15, 2013
StoryCorps

A Husband And Wife Blessed Late In Life

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 7:39 am

The Caplans. Louis, 76, and Harriet, 67, visited StoryCorps in Santa Fe, N.M.
StoryCorps

Harriet and Louis Caplan's love story began 20 years ago in a college town in Kansas. Harriet was 48 and working at a bank. Louis was a 56-year-old physicist.

Both assumed they'd be single for the rest of their lives — until their paths crossed.

It began with Wednesday evening outings when a group would meet after work.

"We went to football games and concerts, and I still don't quite know how it happened, but instead of going in two separate cars, you and I would start going in the same car," Harriet remembers. "I don't think we ever had a date."

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5:21pm

Thu February 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Pope Hurt Head Last Year On Trip To Mexico

Pope Benedict XVI delivers his blessing after an audience with the Roman clergy in the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican on Thursday.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Earlier this week, Pope Benedict XVI shocked the world by announcing he was resigning from his post as head of the Roman Catholic Church. It was the first time a sitting pope had stepped down in nearly 600 years.

As Mark wrote on Monday, Benedict cited his "advanced age (85) and diminishing strength," as reasons for his decision.

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4:58pm

Thu February 14, 2013
Around the Nation

Artist Works To Keep Immigrants In The Picture

Los Angeles-based artist Ramiro Gomez Jr. displays his immigrant worker art on the Capitol's East Lawn in Washington, D.C.
Lizzie Chen NPR

Ramiro Gomez Jr. is working fast enough to draw the least amount of attention, but slowly enough to make every detail stand out. He describes the rush he gets as "therapeutic."

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4:56pm

Thu February 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Frank Lautenberg, Oldest Member Of The Senate, Won't Seek Reelection

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 6:18 pm

Sen. Frank Lautenberg speaks to members of the press in January.
Alex Wong Getty Images

New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg, the oldest member of the senate, announced today that he will not seek re-election.

The New York Times reports:

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4:40pm

Thu February 14, 2013
It's All Politics

As Spending Cuts Loom, Alarm Bells Begin To Sound

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 5:27 pm

Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Martin Dempsey (from left), Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter and Undersecretary of Defense and Comptroller Robert Hale wait for a hearing of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday. Military leaders are warning Congress about the effects of the sequester.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Senate Democrats offered an alternative Thursday to the sequester, the automatic, across-the-board spending cuts set to hit March 1.

Despite dire warnings in congressional hearings this week, many on Capitol Hill seem resigned to the sequester.

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4:28pm

Thu February 14, 2013
Business

Airline Mega-Mergers: 'Good, Bad And Ugly'

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 7:24 pm

A United Airlines aircraft passes by a Continental Airlines plane at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in 2006. Their merger, begun in 2010, has been difficult, analysts say.
Alex Wong Getty Images

The proposed marriage of American Airlines and US Airways announced Thursday is likely the last in a series of industry mega-mergers, but history suggests combining two big carriers isn't easy.

"The history of airline mergers in the U.S. is good, bad and ugly," says Henry Harteveldt, a travel industry analyst at the consulting firm Hudson Crossing. He and many others point to the 2008 union of Delta and Northwest as the best merger in recent memory.

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