2:52pm

Tue September 4, 2012
Arts & Culture

Film-Design Expert Plans Special Public Lecture Sept. 11 at Oaklands Museum

Interior designer/author Cathy Whitlock, who chronicles in print and online how films get their distinctive — and award-winning — looks, plans a special lecture in Murfreesboro on Tuesday, Sept. 11. 


Whitlock’s lecture is co-sponsored by MTSU’s student chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers/International Interior Design Association and the Department of Electronic Media Communication in the university’s College of Mass Communication. It will begin at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 11 in Maney Hall at the Oaklands Historic House Museum. 

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2:34pm

Tue September 4, 2012
Africa

Decades Later, South African Miners Sue Employers

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 3:35 pm

Armstrong Ngutyana (left), 55, and Dumisani Mjolwa, 65, were gold miners during the apartheid era. Both worked underground for nearly three decades. They developed lung disease and were forced to quit their jobs, but received only minimal compensation. They are now part of a class-action lawsuit against South African mining companies.
Anders Kelto for NPR

South Africa's mining industry is under heavy scrutiny after 44 people died during protests at a platinum mine near Johannesburg. Now, the industry is facing challenges on another front: Lawyers have filed a class-action lawsuit against three of the country's biggest gold mining companies.

They're suing on behalf of miners who worked during the apartheid era and now have lung disease.

A settlement in the case — and another like it — could reach into the billions of dollars.

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2:25pm

Tue September 4, 2012
Arts & Culture

‘Painting Painters Paint’ Leads New Fall Exhibits at MTSU’s Todd Gallery

MTSU’s Department of Art is celebrating the fall 2012 semester with “Painting Painters Paint,” an exhibition of the collected works of 15 innovative current artists, in the Todd Art Gallery through Thursday, Sept. 20.


Art Professor Sisavanh Houghton, who envisioned the exhibit, and fellow professors Melissa Newman, Bob Durham and Charles Clary invited colleagues from across the Midsouth to participate. 


The result is an outstanding collection of style, interpretation and process, according to gallery curator Eric Snyder. 

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2:15pm

Tue September 4, 2012
Education

Can A New Building Save A Failing School?

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 4:59 pm

Research shows that students who attend school in buildings that are in disrepair score lower on state tests than students in satisfactory buildings.
iStockphoto.com

When students and teachers at School 16 in Rochester, N.Y., start the new school year in a newer school building, they'll leave their old building's laundry list of infrastructure problems behind.

As teachers finish unloading boxes and setting up their new classrooms, they hope the newer, nicer digs will give students renewed pride in their school. Education experts say the move could also bring a bump to the school's flagging test scores, because better school buildings actually improve academic performance.

A Drain On Spirit And A Drain On Grades

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2:15pm

Tue September 4, 2012
The Two-Way

State Must Grant Murder Convict A Sex Change Operation, Judge Rules

Michelle Kosilek, formerly known as Robert, in 1993.
Lisa Bul AP

A federal judge in Boston today "ordered state prison officials to provide a taxpayer-funded sex-reassignment surgery to a transgender inmate serving life in prison" for murder, The Associated Press writes.

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2:11pm

Tue September 4, 2012
It's All Politics

Are You Better Off? Democrats In Charlotte Say It's Complicated

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 4:21 pm

Caroline Sink (from left), Liz McKeithen, Mary Edith Alexander and Sue Collins were handing out lemonade and cookies in front of the First Presbyterian Church.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Are you better off than you were four years ago?

As Mark reported earlier, that's the question Republicans want Americans to ask themselves as they head to the polls this November.

The question was brought to the forefront after Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley was asked that question on CBS' Face the Nation.

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1:39pm

Tue September 4, 2012
Music News

Why We're Happy Being Sad: Pop's Emotional Evolution

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 2:48 pm

A less complicated time? Petula Clark holds her 1965 gold record for "Downtown," an uptempo song in a major key.
R. McPhedran Getty Images

1:18pm

Tue September 4, 2012
The Two-Way

There's A 'Bear Epidemic' Out West, And It's 'About To Get Worse'

Perhaps not the sight you want to see when you come home: A black bear.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

As Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen has reported for All Things Considered, encounters between humans and bears are up sharply across the western U.S. The bears are having to cover more territory because of droughts that have dried up some of their natural foods, including berries.

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1:07pm

Tue September 4, 2012
The Salt

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 3:13 pm

Even this Maharaja Mac, made specifically for the Indian market, will be off the menu at the new vegetarian McDonald's in India.
kawanet Flickr.com

McDonald's, home of the iconic Big Mac, is going vegetarian. Well, at least in India, where 20 to 42 percent or more of the population (depending on how you count) eschews meat, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization.

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12:23pm

Tue September 4, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Zanzibar Shows Cholera Vaccine Can Protect Even The Unvaccinated

Originally published on Wed September 5, 2012 1:09 pm

A vaccine against cholera bacteria like these protected people in Zanzibar.
CDC

Cholera vaccine gives indirect protection to unvaccinated people in communities where a substantial fraction of the population gets the vaccine, a study in Africa shows.

The effect is called "herd immunity." It works because there are fewer bacteria circulating in communities where vaccination levels are relatively high.

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