12:05pm

Sun August 19, 2012
It's All Politics

Ryan's Taxes Show Gap Between Romney And The Not-So-Rich

Originally published on Fri September 21, 2012 3:35 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks at a town hall meeting in Grand Junction, Colo., on July 10. Romney said he has "nothing hidden" in his taxes.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

With running mate Paul Ryan's tax returns released on a Friday night — a good week and a half ahead of the Republican convention — the presidential campaign can finally move off the subject of tax returns.

Or so Mitt Romney can hope.

In reality, the numbers in the Wisconsin congressman's filings provide new data points, for those inclined to see things this way, about how far Romney's financial situation is from that of ordinary voters.

Depends On The Income

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8:37am

Sun August 19, 2012
The Two-Way

WikiLeaks' Assange Demands U.S. Cease "Witch Hunt"

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 12:44 pm

Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, makes a statement from a balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy in London on Sunday.
Sang Tan AP

Julian Assange stepped onto a balcony of the Ecuadorian embassy in London Sunday to demand that the U.S. end its persecution of WikiLeaks. It was his first public appearance since taking refuge inside the embassy in June.

"I ask President Obama to do the right thing," he said. "The United States must renounce its witch hunt against WikiLeaks."

Update @ 9:47 a.m. ET: 'War On Whistleblowers'

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6:12am

Sun August 19, 2012
Participation Nation

Caring For Canines In Seguin, Texas

Carol Hirschi and her dogs.
Courtesy of Robin Bisha

Mama Bella is sudsy, and we're soaked. I'm holding the leash while Carol Hirschi scrubs the black dog's tummy.

"When people bring me a dog, I'm sure they don't picture me washing her crotch," she laughs.

Hirschi rescues dogs. Her Moshiem Mansion Bed & Breakfast houses a changing cast of 10 to 15 dogs that have escaped death in the shelter.

"I leave the happy-go-lucky ones and pull the ones who are terrified," Hirschi says, "The ones who understand what's happening."

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Ashley Gross is KPLU's business and labor reporter, covering everything from Amazon.com and Boeing to garbage strikes. She joined the station in May 2012 after working for five years at WBEZ in Chicago, where she reported on business and the economy. Her work telling the human side of the mortgage crisis garnered awards from the Illinois Associated Press and the Chicago Headline Club. She's also reported for the Alaska Public Radio Network in Anchorage and for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.

She studied history at Brown University and earned a master's in international affairs at Columbia University. She grew up in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She lives in West Seattle with her husband and two sons.

5:21am

Sun August 19, 2012
The Salt

Shop Owners Hope Yogurt Smooths A Path Out Of Greek Recession

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:23 am

Dimitris Plassas and Georgia Ladopoulou work the yogurt bar at Fresko, which specializes in several varieties of Greek-style yogurt.
Joanna Kakissis NPR

Greeks used to take their yogurt for granted. This year, at anti-austerity protests, they even threw it at their politicians. But Greeks are finally realizing yogurt might actually help the country during its worst recession in half a century.

In Athens, dozens of entrepreneurs have opened yogurt bars. The first one, called Fresko, opened last year on a pedestrian street near the Acropolis. It features four types of rich, strained yogurt kept cool in traditional ceramic pots.

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5:21am

Sun August 19, 2012
Your Money

Stores Banking On Personalized Loyalty Programs

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 5:56 pm

A customer using Safeway's personalized deals gets this loaf of bread for 99 cents instead of the original $4.29.
Ashley Gross KPLU

Loyalty cards have long given discounts to shoppers who sign up, but stores are increasingly offering personalized discounts tailored to each customer's shopping patterns.

Those tailored discounts mean someone standing in front of you at the supermarket checkout line might get a lower price on the exact same gallon of milk that you're buying.

A 'Secret Deal'

Heather Kulper is one of those people who really wants to get a good deal. She's a mom in a suburb north of Seattle who writes a blog about coupon clipping and saving money.

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5:21am

Sun August 19, 2012
Presidential Race

Riddled With Crime, N.J. City Turns To County Police

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 6:08 pm

The city of Camden, N.J., is considering getting rid of its own police force and turning to the county to try and combat record crime.
Mel Evans AP

Although considered one of the most dangerous places in the country, past budget cuts in Camden, N.J., have forced police layoffs. Now the city is considering even more dramatic steps: replacing the city's police force with one operated by the county.

Camden is on pace to break a record for homicides and shootings this year, and many in the crime-ravaged city say something has to change.

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5:21am

Sun August 19, 2012
Business

She's No Man; She's A Lobsterman

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 4:46 pm

Lobsterman Genevieve Kurilec holds a lobster caught while fishing along Deer Isle, Maine. Kurilec says more women are beginning to captain their own lobster boats.
Chris Arnold NPR

In New England, more women are breaking through the glass gangway. That's the ramp you use to walk down onto a dock to hop onboard your own fishing boat. For generations lobstermen in Maine have been predominantly, well, men — but that's starting to change.

At a small gas dock in a rock-lined cove on Deer Isle, Maine, there's a new captain fueling up. Genevieve Kurilec, 29, wears a tank-top, orange fishing overalls and lobster buoy earrings.

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5:54pm

Sat August 18, 2012
Law

Kids Behind Bars: Illinois Rethinks Juvenile Justice

Originally published on Sun August 19, 2012 5:36 pm

Elias Roman, 17, has been through Illinois' juvenile justice system twice. But the second time around, he was paired with a mentor, and he's looking at things differently.
Cheryl Corley NPR

In an alley in Little Village on Chicago's West Side, the faint sound of music from a Spanish-speaking radio station wafts in the air and garbage cans are sprayed with gang graffiti. They look like the tattoos on 17-year-old Elias Roman's arms.

"This [alleyway] right here is where I caught my first gun case," says Elias, who was born and raised in the neighborhood, home to a large Mexican-American community.

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4:01pm

Sat August 18, 2012
Author Interviews

Soccer Star Hope Solo On Loving Lost Parents

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 12:46 pm

Goalkeeper Hope Solo competes against China in Chester, Penn., on May 27. Solo took a gold medal home from this summer's London Games.
Drew Hallowell Getty Images

Hope Solo is generally regarded as the best women's goalkeeper in the world. Fresh off winning her third-straight Olympic gold medal with the U.S. national team, Solo has been as busy off the field as on it, releasing an autobiography titled Solo: A Memoir of Hope.

The memoir details her rise as an international celebrity, but it also focuses on the complicated relationship she had with her father, who taught her to play soccer.

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