3:44pm

Sat September 8, 2012
NPR Story

Week In News: The Post-Convention Push

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 7:55 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF POLITICAL AD)

MITT ROMNEY: In the last four years, we've seen that promise fade away. Hispanics are hurting.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: But Mitt Romney would break that promise, replace your benefits with a voucher.

RAZ: Some of the latest political ads coming out of the Romney and Obama campaigns. James Fallows of The Atlantic joins me now, as he does most Saturdays, for a look behind the headlines. Jim, welcome.

JAMES FALLOWS: Hello, Guy.

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11:51am

Sat September 8, 2012
Music Interviews

Dave Matthews On His Band's 'Unique Sort Of Love Affair'

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 7:55 pm

"I can remember saying 'I can't imagine that I'm going to be doing this when I'm 45' — and I'm 45," Dave Matthews says.
Courtesy of the artist

For many people, the definitive soundtrack of the mid-1990s was a band out of Virginia with unusual instrumentation and an unmistakable sound. Born and partially raised in South Africa, Dave Matthews was a bartender in the college town of Charlottesville when he founded the Dave Matthews Band in 1991. Two decades on, the group has sold 40 million records and become one of the biggest live acts in the world.

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9:36am

Sat September 8, 2012
It's All Politics

Words Wealthy Democratic Donors Should Get Used To: 'It's Me, Rahm'

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 1:11 pm

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants you ... if you're a wealthy Democrat who can write a $10 million or $20 million check.
Lynne Sladky AP

Now that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is in charge of raising really big dollars for a superPAC that supports President Obama, wealthy Democrats all over the country may be eyeing their phones nervously.

Emanuel, the former Obama White House chief of staff, is known for not taking no for an answer and for aggressively going after what he wants.

Indeed, he's a ferocious fundraiser who gets to the point, often throwing in an epithet or two for emphasis, just the sort of rainmaker needed by Priorities USA Action, the pro-Obama superPAC that desperately needs cash.

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5:06am

Sat September 8, 2012
Around the Nation

Looking To 'Future,' Ga. Schools Require Mandarin

Originally published on Mon September 10, 2012 10:57 am

Instructor Huiling Li encourages second-grader Trinity Faulkner on the first day of Mandarin Chinese classes at Brookdale Elementary School in Macon, Ga.
Adam Ragusea for NPR

Public schools in Macon, Ga., and surrounding Bibb County have a lot of problems. Most of the 25,000 students are poor enough to qualify for free and reduced lunch, and about half don't graduate.

Bibb County's Haitian-born superintendent Romain Dallemand came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls "The Macon Miracle." There are now longer schools days, year-round instruction, and one mandate nobody saw coming: Mandarin Chinese for every student, pre-K through 12th grade.

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5:03am

Sat September 8, 2012
Latin America

Plan For Cuban Ballet School A Dance Of Art, Politics

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 8:39 pm

Cuban ballet dancer Carlos Acosta has a bold plan to transform a long-abandoned, incompletely built ballet school in Havana into a global cultural and dance center. But some fear the plan is a step toward "privatization."
Nick Miroff for NPR

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

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4:59am

Sat September 8, 2012
Politics

As Election Nears, Keeping Donors A Secret Is Trickier

Originally published on Sun September 9, 2012 4:32 pm

iStockphoto.com

4:58am

Sat September 8, 2012
Around the Nation

Forget The Heels: What It Takes To Be Miss Navajo

Originally published on Sat September 8, 2012 11:41 am

Miss Navajo contestants must work in teams to butcher sheep. From left, Wallitta Begay, Leandra "Abby" Thomas and Charlene Goodluck had to cut the sheep's throat, remove the stomach and quarter the carcass.
Laurel Morales for NPR

The Miss Navajo contest is not your typical beauty pageant. Instead of swimsuits and high heels, you get turquoise and moccasins. One of the talent competitions is butchering sheep, and speaking Navajo is a must.

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11:04pm

Fri September 7, 2012
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction Round 9: Pick A President

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 2:49 pm

Best-selling author Brad Meltzer is our judge for Round 9 of Three-Minute Fiction. His books include The Inner Circle, The Book of Fate and The Millionaires. His latest book, The Fifth Assassin, is due out in January.
Eric Ogden

This election season, Three-Minute Fiction is getting political. Weekends on All Things Considered has a new judge, a new challenge and a new prize for Round 9. For this contest, submit original, short fiction that can be read in about three minutes, which means no more than 600 words.

The judge for this round is writer Brad Meltzer. He's the author of seven novels, including the best-seller The Inner Circle. His newest thriller, The Fifth Assassin, will be out in January.

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6:20pm

Fri September 7, 2012
The Two-Way

Wikipedia Irks Philip Roth With Reluctance To Edit Entry About His Novel

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 7:24 pm

Author Philip Roth resorted to an open letter to Wikipedia when his efforts to correct an error on the site were rebuffed. The entry in question was about his book, The Human Stain.
AFP Getty Images

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