7:39am

Sun May 20, 2012
History

A Lawman Killed By Hate; Now, ATF Remembers

Host Rachel Martin takes a moment to remember William Henderson Foote, a black federal agent in Mississippi in the late 1800s. He was honored this week by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

7:39am

Sun May 20, 2012
Afghanistan

White House Balances Money, Security In Afghanistan

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So as we just heard, this NATO summit will be crucial when it comes to working out who's going to put up the money needed to support and train Afghan security forces in the years to come. The White House is leading the charge, so next we go to Ben Rhodes, White House spokesman on national security issues. Ben Rhodes, thanks so much for joining us.

BEN RHODES: Good to be with you.

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7:39am

Sun May 20, 2012
Middle East

Lessons For Egyptian Elections From Turkey

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And when Egyptians head to the polls this week, many will be looking to celebrate the end of military rule, which began some 50 years ago. Observers warn that it won't be easy to send a deeply entrenched military back to its barracks, and they point to Turkey's experience as an example.

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul.

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7:39am

Sun May 20, 2012
Afghanistan

NATO Buzzword: 'Sustainment' In Afghanistan

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. World leaders are gathered in Chicago for a two-day NATO summit, which starts this morning. The summit agenda centers on Afghanistan, specifically figuring out how to meet a 2014 withdrawal deadline while shoring up Afghanistan's security forces. We'll hear a view from the White House in a moment. But we begin with this report from NPR's Jackie Northam in Chicago.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE CHANTING)

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7:39am

Sun May 20, 2012
Middle East

Egyptian Candidate Gains Support, Despite Reputation

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Egyptians are getting ready for an historic vote, their first real presidential election since former President Hosni Mubarak was ousted during the Arab Spring. Twelve candidates are in the running. One them, former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, is already dividing voters ahead of Wednesday's vote. Many consider Shafiq a corrupt holdover from the old regime.

But as NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Cairo, he is gaining widespread support from Egyptians fed up with the growing insecurity in their country.

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5:10am

Sun May 20, 2012
Africa

South Sudanese Children Find Hope In Education

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 6:46 pm

Students like those of Good Hope Basic Primary School in South Sudan are still catching up nearly a year after independence from Sudan.
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton NPR

The teachers' staff-room is a charming thatched building adjacent to the classrooms overlooking the dusty recreation and assembly ground at Good Hope Basic Primary School in Bentiu, the capital of oil-rich Unity State in South Sudan.

Bentiu is near the disputed border with Sudan and within striking distance of Sudanese fighter jets and warplanes.

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5:10am

Sun May 20, 2012
Africa

After A Free Fall, Zimbabwe Finds A Bit Of Stability

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 7:39 am

Many stores in Zimbabwe were largely empty when the country was suffering hyperinflation a few years ago. Conditions are much better now.
Philmon Bulawayo Reuters /Landov

When hyperinflation spiraled out of control in Zimbabwe in 2008, huge numbers of citizens flocked across the border to find jobs, and escape food and water shortages.

That economic nightmare came on top of years of decline. While the country still hasn't fully recovered, Zimbabwe is much more stable and economic life is picking up, at least for some.

On Robert Mugabe Road in the capital Harare, taxi drivers shout out their destinations. Street vendors sell leather belts and cellphone accessories to passersby.

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5:09am

Sun May 20, 2012
Europe

Euros Not Austerity: Can Greece Have It Both Ways?

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 8:38 am

At the G-8 summit Saturday, French President Francois Hollande said he wanted Greece to stay in the eurozone and expected the country to meet its commitments. In saying so, Hollande identified the difficult debate which has gripped Greece for months now.

Most Greeks want to keep the euro as their currency. Most also want to cancel the eurozone-imposed austerity measures that come with the billions in international bailout loans keeping the country solvent.

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2:39am

Sun May 20, 2012
Asia

After Chinese Activist's Arrival, Rest And Relief

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 7:39 am

Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng and his wife Yuan Weijing arrive at the New York University Village apartment complex in New York Saturday.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

U.S. diplomats are breathing a sigh of relief Sunday after a human rights activist sheltered briefly by the U.S. embassy in Beijing was allowed to leave China and come to the United States. Chen Guangcheng arrived Saturday night with his wife and two children. He has a fellowship to study at New York University.

Chen appeared briefly before the cameras Saturday night in New York's Greenwich Village, where he will be living with his family and studying law.

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5:18pm

Sat May 19, 2012
Economy

Could Glass-Steagall Have Stopped JPMorgan Loss?

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 12:15 pm

JPMorgan, the largest bank in the United States, is seeking to minimize the damage caused by a $2 billion trading loss, disclosed earlier this month.
Mark Lennihan AP

Following JP Morgan's disclosure of a $2 billion loss, a small but increasingly vocal group of lawmakers and economists are arguing that a 60-year-old piece if financial legislation should never have been repealed in 1999.

They say the law, known as the Glass-Steagall Act, was so consequential that there's a direct link between its repeal and both the 2008 financial meltdown and JPMorgan's huge loss.

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