2:03am

Thu July 19, 2012
Dead Stop

A Muslim Cemetery Helps To Ease Funerals' Strain

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 1:52 pm

At the Garden of Peace cemetery in Flint, Mich., Muslims are buried in accordance with traditional Islamic burial rites.
Sami Yenigun NPR

The Garden of Peace cemetery opened when the Islamic community in Flint, Mich., needed a place to bury their dead in accordance with their religion. After operating for only a couple of years, the cemetery has already welcomed a diverse group of American Muslims.

Tucked in the left corner of an open field, on a breezy, buggy, warm summer morning in Flint, lie parallel rows of identical headstones. There are roughly 30 of them, all facing the same direction.

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5:28pm

Wed July 18, 2012
Environment

Interactive: Mapping The U.S. Drought

Originally published on Thu August 23, 2012 2:40 pm

More than half the country is experiencing drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.
NPR/U.S. Drought Monitor

Texas experienced its worst drought on record last year. Now that the state is seeing some relief, drought conditions have consumed more than half the United States. Use this interactive map and chart to see how conditions have changed over time. Related story: 1,200 counties affected.

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5:19pm

Wed July 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Service Members In Colombia Prostitution Scandal Won't Face Criminal Charges

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 5:35 am

Ten members of the U.S. military who were involved in the Secret Service prostitution scandal have received punishment but will not face criminal charges.

NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Those disciplined include seven soldiers and two Marines. They received administrative punishment that could include penalties such as loss of pay.

"Another Air Force member has been reprimanded and investigations are continuing against two Navy sailors.

"Officials say there will be no criminal charges.

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5:08pm

Wed July 18, 2012
Election 2012

Portman A Low-Key Possibility For GOP Running Mate

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 2:34 pm

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, campaigns with Mitt Romney in Cincinnati on Feb. 20.
Mark Lyons Getty Images

As the guessing game continues about Mitt Romney's choice of a running mate, Ohio Sen. Rob Portman invariably comes up as a top contender. And with a wealth of experience in Washington and beyond, Portman would be considered a safe pick to run for vice president on the Republican ticket.

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5:03pm

Wed July 18, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Prostate Cancer Surgery Shows No Benefit For Many Men

Surgery for prostate cancer shouldn't be an automatic choice, a new study says.
iStockphoto.com

Finally, the results from a decades-long study that compared surgery for prostate cancer to careful monitoring have been published.

Overall, the researchers found no difference in rates of death from any cause, including prostate cancer, among men who had their prostates surgically removed compared to those who didn't.

Preliminary results were released more than a year ago.

The newly published conclusion:

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5:01pm

Wed July 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Is American Stalling On A Merger With US Airways?

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 9:05 pm

US Airways CEO Doug Parker waits to be introduced prior to his address to a National Press Club Newsmaker Luncheon in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Could it be that American Airlines CEO Tom Horton is resisting the warm embrace of US Airways CEO Doug Parker over a little thing like money?

During a National Press Club luncheon Wednesday, Parker didn't exactly shoot down suggestions that American's leadership has been stalling on a merger of the two carriers because of the potential for personal gain.

Asked whether Horton is focused on the payday he would get if American were to remain independent a while longer, Parker hesitated. For more than 8 seconds, his answer was: "Um. The. Uh. Let's see."

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4:41pm

Wed July 18, 2012
Around the Nation

Drought Brings Misery To Arkansas River Basin

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 7:19 pm

A deer carcass lies on the dried riverbed of the Arkansas River in Lakin, Kan.
Frank Morris for NPR

Drought has set in early and hard across the Midwest, parching the Arkansas River basin. The river trickling out of the mountains is dry before it reaches some of the major agricultural uses downstream. And the drought is torching crops, sapping tourism and threatening supplies of drinking water.

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4:29pm

Wed July 18, 2012
Around the Nation

In Fairplay, Colo., Burro Racing Packs 'Em In

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 8:08 am

A skill in pack burro racing is convincing a donkey that it should run when it would rather walk. Racers may get behind the pack if they don't work with their animal.
Megan Verlee for NPR

First thing you need to know about burro racing — there's no riding. It's you on one end of a rope, hundreds pounds of equine on the other. And the burro, says Brad Wann, is the boss.

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4:10pm

Wed July 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Using Hubble, Astronomers Spot Oldest Spiral Galaxy Ever Seen

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 5:29 pm

An artist's rendering of galaxy BX442.
Joe Bergeron Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics

Astronomers made a surprising announcement today: They have found a spiral galaxy that existed very early in the universe — the oldest spiral galaxy ever seen.

The galaxy is special because such a well-formed spiral wasn't thought to have existed this early on, when the universe was tumultuous.

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4:02pm

Wed July 18, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

HIV Cure Is Closer As Patient's Full Recovery Inspires New Research

Originally published on Wed July 18, 2012 6:30 pm

Nurse Priscila-Grace Gonzaga with Gregg Cassin, a San Francisco gay man who has been infected with HIV since the early 1980s. He's a volunteer in a cutting-edge gene therapy experiment to see whether HIV-infected people can be given an immune system that is invulnerable to HIV infection.
Richard Knox NPR

Ask AIDS researchers why they think a cure to the disease is possible and the first response is "the Berlin patient."

That patient is a wiry, 46-year-old American from Seattle named Timothy Ray Brown. He got a bone marrow transplant five years ago when he was living in Berlin.

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