2:00pm

Sat March 10, 2012
Asia

Volunteers Aid Lives Shattered By Japan Disaster

As Japan continues to rebuild after last year's devastating earthquake and tsunami, many Japanese are devoting themselves to dealing with the human costs of the tragedy. Almost 20,000 people died in the disaster, but many thousands more were left injured, homeless and destitute. Doualy Xaykaothao met a group of Japanese people trying to make a difference.

2:00pm

Sat March 10, 2012
Asia

A Year Later, Japan Slowly Recovers

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

It's already Sunday in Japan. And people across that country will begin to commemorate the victims of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck one year ago. In a moment, we're going to hear about a group of volunteers who have been working with survivors, helping them get back on their feet.

But first to our correspondent Anthony Kuhn who's in Japan. And, Anthony, tell us, first of all, where you are and how it compares to what you saw a year ago.

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Kathleen Masterson was Harvest Public Media’s reporter based at Iowa Public Radio in Ames, Iowa. At Bowdoin College in Maine, Kathleen studied English and Environmental Studies and was torn as to which one she’d have to “choose” when finding a job. She taught high school English for a few years, and then swung back to science when she traveled to rural Argentina to work on a bird research project. She returned home to study science journalism at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. After graduate school she went on to work as digital producer for NPR’s science desk before joining Harvest.

11:45am

Sat March 10, 2012
Media

Ag-Gag Law Blows Animal Activists' Cover

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 5:12 pm

Struthers raises about 4,500 pigs for meat every year.
Kathleen Masterson Iowa Public Radio

After a series of videos revealing apparent cruel treatment of farm animals went viral, Iowa has made it a crime for people to misrepresent themselves to gain access to a farm. The so-called "Ag-Gag" law targets undercover animal rights activists who secretly take videos. Farmers say they need the legal protection to block those trying to take down agriculture, but critics ask what the industry may be hiding.

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8:55am

Sat March 10, 2012
Arts & Life

Here (And There, And Really Everywhere) Be Dragons

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 4:43 pm

A close-up of a dragon robe, or long pao, dated late 18th- or early 19th-century China. It's one of many on display in the exhibit "Dragons, Nagas, and Creatures of the Deep" at the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C.
Renee Comet Textile Museum

As the supernatural enjoys a pop culture resurgence — from vampires to fairy tales — there's also been a firestorm of fascination with dragons. Fire-breathing dragons are central to the much-anticipated second season of the HBO series Game of Thrones, which opens April 1. And this year alone the mystical creatures are being featured in two movies, a new book, video games and a museum exhibit.

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3:56am

Sat March 10, 2012
Economy

Job Trend More Than A Blip, But U.S. 'Can't Stop'

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 12:49 pm

President Obama speaks after touring Rolls-Royce Crosspointe engineering plant in Virginia on Friday. Obama declared America "will thrive again" after another encouraging report on jobs growth.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

The American job market is still a long way from healthy, but its pulse feels a lot stronger now than it did six months ago. The Labor Department says employers added 227,000 workers to their payrolls in February, a solid — if not spectacular — performance. It continues a trend that suggests a genuine recovery, not a temporary blip.

The unemployment rate held steady at 8.3 percent, even as nearly 500,000 people joined the workforce.

Improvement in the job market is a boon for President Obama as he tries to hold onto his own job in November.

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11:01pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction Round 8: She Closed The Book...

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 10:06 pm

Luis Alberto Urrea was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction in 2005.
Nicole Waite Little, Brown & Co.

Ready for some creative competition? Weekends on All Things Considered is launching Round 8 of its Three-Minute Fiction contest. Here's what we look for: original, short fiction that can be read in less than three minutes — that's no more than 600 words.

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10:27pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Animals

Stubborn As A Mule's Knot: Chiropractor Eases Pain

Mules have carried people and supplies in Grand Canyon National Park for more than a century. Now they have a chiropractor to soothe their aching muscles.
John Moore Getty Images

The famous pack mules that carry supplies and people in and out of the Grand Canyon have back pain, as you might imagine. One man is on a mission to make the lives of these beasts of burden a little less painful.

When Rene Noriega retired a few years ago after a long career as a Border Patrol agent, he took what — for him — was the next natural step.

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5:47pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Chilling New View Of The 1986 Challenger Explosion

Challenger explosion.
Huffington Post

Today, The Huffington Post released what it says is a never-before-seen video of the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.

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