10:59am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Salt

Intense Aromas Lead To Smaller Bites

The stronger the aroma, the more likely you are to take a smaller bite, researchers found.
iStockphoto.com

We've known for a while that a food's aroma has a big influence on our perception of how it tastes. Now it looks like smell also can affect how much we eat.

People who ate vanilla custard in a laboratory ate smaller bites when they smelled a stronger cream aroma, according to a new study. The stronger the smell, the smaller the bite.

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10:58am

Wed March 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

High Altitude Got You Down? Try Ibuprofen

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 8:17 am

If hiking in the High Sierra gives you a headache, ibuprofen could help.
Miguel Vieira Flickr

If you're the type who likes to hike, ski or climb mountains, you might want to pack a bottle of ibuprofen — not just for achy muscle aches, but to help prevent altitude sickness.

Tens of millions of people travel to high-altitude spots each year, and a quarter of them wind up with acute altitude sickness from ascending too fast. The headaches, dizziness, sleeplessness, nausea, vomiting and other symptoms can ruin a vacation. In severe cases, it can cause fatal swelling in the brain.

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9:50am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Jeb Bush Endorses Romney

Then-governors Mitt Romney (left) of Massachusetts and Jeb Bush of Florida in 2005. Bush has endorsed his fellow Republican's presidential bid.
Steven Senne AP

One day after Mitt Romney's win in Illinois and the talk that has again raised about the former Massachusetts governor being the "inevitable" Republican presidential nominee, he's picked up the coveted endorsement of former Florida governor Jeb Bush.

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9:48am

Wed March 21, 2012
National Security

Accused Sergeant Heads Down A Long Legal Road

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 10:50 am

Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, who is accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians, will have the case heard in the military justice system, which has significant differences from the civilian courts. Here, Bales is shown in a training exercise in Fort Irwin, Calif., last August.
Spc. Ryan Hallock AP

The military justice system has been crafted to work efficiently, but Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales can expect a lengthy legal process as he faces accusations that he killed 16 men, women and children in Afghanistan

Bales is locked up in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, as he and his lawyer prepare for a case that involves a horrendous mass murder. In addition, it's a stress point that could trigger retaliation against American troops and even affect the course of a U.S. war that's more than a decade old.

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9:12am

Wed March 21, 2012
Local

MTSU and the Tennessean Host Community 'Tweetup' to Address Child Obesity

MTSU/Tennessean Tweetup on Obesity

MTSU and The Tennessean tag-teamed Twitter March 20 to help alert and inform middle Tennessee about the dangers of childhood obesity in an inaugural on-campus “Tweetup.”

Attended by about 100 people in person and followed in a live stream at www.BrainstormNashville.comand on Twitter and Facebook by dozens more, the discussion featured presentations by MTSU’s Dr. Don Morgan, an expert on physical fitness and childhood obesity, and Tennessean Health Editor Heidi Hall.

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8:58am

Wed March 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Doctors' Missteps Online Can Lead To Disciplinary Action

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 4:01 pm

Doc, don't be caught red-faced online!
iStockphoto.com

Can your doctor really say that online?

Well, doctors can and do say all kinds of derogatory things about patients online. On the other hand, some doctors take another tack and use their computers and smartphones to ask patients out. And then there are the doctors who go online to prescribe medicines for patients they've never seen.

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8:45am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Women Continue To Fill Rick Perry's Facebook Wall With Mock Questions

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 8:46 am

Gov. Rick Perry's Facebook page, the scene of contention.
Facebook.com/GovernorPerry

Here's the first of more than 5,600 comments we saw this morning when we went to Texas Gov. Rick Perry's Facebook page and opened up a post on his wall thanking those who supported his bid for the Republican presidential nomination:

"Governor Perry, I am experiencing mid-cycle cramping. Is this a punishment from god for not getting pregnant this month?"

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7:50am

Wed March 21, 2012

7:36am

Wed March 21, 2012
It's All Politics

Why Dreams Of A Contested GOP Convention Are Slipping Away Again

Like leap year, talk of a brokered convention seems to surface every presidential cycle. Unlike leap year, the brokered convention itself rarely seems to happen in the end.

But this time around, as the GOP candidates grind it out delegate by delegate, the prospects seemed greater than at any time in the past few decades. As recently as Monday, Rick Santorum insisted he could collect enough delegates to deny rival Mitt Romney the 1,144 needed to clinch the nomination outright.

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7:35am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Trayvon Martin's Killer Had Been Accused Of Violence In The Past

George Zimmerman, in a 2005 mug shot provided by the Orange County (Fla.) jail, via The Miami Herald.
AP
  • Kathy Lohr, on 'Morning Edition'

As national attention continues to be focused on the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., last month and the questions it resurrects about race relations in the U.S., The Orlando Sentinel today adds to what's known about George Zimmerman, the 28-year-old man who pulled the trigger.

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