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Take a look at the corrections page. We're making the same kinds of mistakes over and over. Names. Numbers. Titles. We're getting those, and other things, wrong.

This month has been especially busy. From reporters to producers to editors, it's clear that we aren't always double-checking the basics.

The result is that some great stories have corrections notes attached to them. That's a shame.

So, once again:

Playing Hanafuda With The Hand You're Dealt

15 minutes ago

At her home in Honolulu, our grandmother hovered above us, inspecting our cards: illustrations of wisteria, chrysanthemum, cherry and plum blossoms and, if we were lucky, a crane perched among pine branches. My cousins and I were playing a 200-year-old Japanese card game called hanafuda, which translates to "flower cards." She taught us the game when we were young, maybe so she could have a new crop of opponents to defeat.

A new study published in the journal Science finds that methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 60 percent higher than previous estimates from the federal government.

A new study published in the journal Science finds that methane emissions from U.S. oil and gas operations are 60 percent higher than previous estimates from the federal government.

Robert Edgell has grown accustomed to seeing bald eagles soar over the family farm in Federalsburg, Md., so, when he discovered the carcasses of more than a dozen dead raptors on the property two years ago, he "was dumbfounded," he told The Washington Post.

"Usually you see one or two soaring over the place, but to see 13 in that area and all deceased. ... In all my years, I'd not seen anything like this," Edgell said.

FACT CHECK: Trump, Illegal Immigration And Crime

8 hours ago

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

After days of damaging news stories about an administration policy that separated immigrant families at the Southern border, President Trump tried to change the narrative Friday. He spoke up for grieving family members who have lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally.

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yukoninfo.com

Smokejumpers have fought a 25-acre wildfire near the Alaska-Canada border to a standstill after being called in Thursday because it appeared to be headed straight toward a remote border-crossing station.

6:40 pm newscast for Friday, June 22, 2018 from WBEZ, Chicago's NPR news station.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The so-called wolf pack is out, and their release has once again unleashed furor throughout Spain.

Protesters are marching through the streets of Pamplona, Madrid and Seville, among other cities on Friday, demonstrating a Spanish court's decision to grant bail to five men who were convicted of sexually abusing a young woman during the 2016 Running of the Bulls festivities, El Pais reported.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Peace talks between the leaders of South Sudan's warring factions have proven so far to be unfruitful, with no agreement on the table and their June 30 deadline nearing, Carolyn Thompson reports for NPR.

A spokesman for South Sudan government said Friday "we have had enough."

The total number of people apprehended for illegally crossing the southern U.S. border has been steadily falling for almost two decades. It's a long-term trend that sociologists, economists and federal officials have been tracking for years.

3 Charts That Show What's Actually Happening Along The Southern Border

12 hours ago

The total number of people apprehended for illegally crossing the southern U.S. border has been steadily falling for almost two decades. It's a long-term trend that sociologists, economists and federal officials have been tracking for years.

MoviePass / Fail?

12 hours ago

If you pay MoviePass 10 dollars a month, you can go to the movies every day. That's a dream for movie buffs, and it's attracted a lot of subscribers. But it also means the company is losing millions of dollars every month.

But this business model — lose lots of money up front and find a way to be profitable later — is becoming more common these days. But is it really sustainable? Today on the show, how MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe is trying to come up with an answer.

4:00 pm newscast for Friday, June 22, 2018 from WBEZ, Chicago's NPR news station.

Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET

In the image, a little girl wails in uncomprehending sadness and anxiety.

Her face flushed nearly as pink as her shirt and shoes, she stares up at her mother and a U.S. official, both too tall to be seen. The 2-year-old Honduran child's panic is so palpable, it's difficult for a viewer not to feel it, too.

With more than 3 billion public land and marine acres in the U.S., it seems as if there should be more than enough outdoor space for everyone.

Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET

In the image, a little girl wails in uncomprehending sadness and anxiety.

Her face flushed nearly as pink as her shirt and shoes, she stares up at her mother and a U.S. official, both too tall to be seen. The 2-year-old Honduran child's panic is so palpable, it's difficult for a viewer not to feel it, too.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

After days of damaging news stories about an administration policy that separated immigrant families at the Southern border, President Trump tried to change the narrative Friday. He spoke up for grieving family members who have lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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