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6:33am

Sun March 31, 2013
Europe

Pope Francis Delivers First Easter Sunday Mass

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 5:19 pm

After celebrating Mass along with more than 250,000 faithful, Pope Francis delivered a plea for peace in his first Easter Sunday message to the world, decrying the seemingly endless conflicts in the Middle East and on the Korean Peninsula.
AFP/Getty Images

Pope Francis celebrated his first Easter Sunday Mass praying for world peace and urging a diplomatic solution to the standoff on the Korean peninsula.

Only two weeks after his election, the first pope from the developing world continues to make his mark on the Catholic Church.

St. Peter's Square was bedecked with flowers and packed with joyous pilgrims and tourists as Pope Francis celebrated Easter Mass.

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4:39am

Sun March 31, 2013
Sports

Defending Women's Champs Baylor To Battle Cardinals' Tough Defense

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 1:52 pm

Baylor's Brittney Griner goes up to dunk in a second-round game of the NCAA women's college basketball tournament against Florida State on Tuesday in Waco, Texas. On Sunday, Baylor faces Louisville.
Tony Gutierrez AP

The NCAA women's basketball tournament's Sweet 16 round continues Sunday, with No. 1 overall seed Baylor taking on No. 5 University of Louisville. Baylor is the defending national champion, and is widely considered the team to beat in this tournament.

Baylor has been one of the most successful women's programs in the nation since head coach Kim Mulkey's first national championship in 2005. The Lady Bears have lost only one game in the past two seasons, and Brooklyn Pope, the lone graduate student on the roster, says they're mentally tougher in 2013.

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4:39am

Sun March 31, 2013
History

Old Newspapers Shed New Light On Emmett Till Murder

Originally published on Sun March 31, 2013 5:21 pm

Officers stand by in 1955 as religious leaders from Chicago demonstrate outside the White House in Washington over the murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till.
AP

New details about one of Mississippi's most infamous murders are coming to light — more than a half-century later. The death of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy who allegedly whistled at a white woman, helped spark the civil rights movement.

Till lived in Chicago, and was visiting his relatives in the Mississippi Delta when he was murdered. His body was mutilated and dumped into a river. The accused were the woman's husband and her half-brother, and their trial drew reporters from both the white and black press.

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4:35pm

Sat March 30, 2013
Health Care

Three Years On, States Still Struggle With Health Care Law Messaging

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 5:25 pm

Joy Reynolds of San Diego looks at the newspapers on display at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., on June 29, 2012, following the Supreme Court ruling on President Obama's health care law.
David Goldman AP

It is hard to imagine that after three years of acrimony and debate we could still be so confused about President Obama's Affordable Care Act.

Is it actually possible Americans know less about Obamacare now than they did three years ago? Apparently that is the case, and the news comes just as the most sweeping effects of the law are about to kick in.

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3:58pm

Sat March 30, 2013
Around the Nation

For One Military Family, DOMA Decision Will Hit Close To Home

Originally published on Sat March 30, 2013 5:25 pm

Same-sex couples in the military will be watching closely now that the U.S. Supreme Court is considering the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act. Anxiously awaiting a decision are Army lieutenant colonel Heather Mack and her wife, Ashley Broadway, who've been together for 15 years and have two children. They say repealing DOMA would help many enlisted same-sex military couples, who don't receive funds to move non-military spouses from one base to the next.

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