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2:01am

Thu July 11, 2013
Environment

Saving One Species At The Expense Of Another

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 3:52 pm

Antelopes stand at alert at the presence of a human visitor in the sparsely populated Centennial Valley of Montana.
John W. Poole NPR

To keep America's wilderness anything like it used to be when the country was truly wild takes the help of biologists. They have to balance the needs of wildlife with those of cattle-ranching and tourism, and even weigh the value of one species against another. Ultimately, they have to pick and choose who makes it onto the ark. And, as scientists in Montana's Centennial Valley have discovered, all that choosing can be tricky.

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6:46pm

Wed July 10, 2013
World

50 People Believed Dead In Quebec Train Explosion

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Canadian police say they found five more bodies in the rubble of the small village in Quebec devastated by a train explosion on Saturday. That brings the confirmed death toll to 20. And officials say the 30 people still missing are now presumed dead. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann is on the scene. He joins us now on the line.

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6:13pm

Wed July 10, 2013
It's All Politics

House GOP: We Won't Consider Senate Immigration Bill

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:21 pm

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio meets with reporters on Capitol Hill on Tuesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The prospects for an immigration overhaul effort that could reshape the contours of American society appeared grim Wednesday after a closed door meeting of House Republicans.

A majority of the fractious House Republican Conference lined up in opposition to (barely) bipartisan legislation already approved by the Democratic-controlled Senate, despite the urging of leaders to do something on the issue.

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5:57pm

Wed July 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Snowden Is A Whistle-Blower, Americans Say In Poll

More than half of Americans in a new Quinnipiac University national poll see former National Security Agency contract worker Edward Snowden, who spilled secrets about the NSA's surveillance programs, as a whistle-blower, not a traitor.
Ole Spata DPA /LANDOV

More than half of American voters in a new Quinnipiac University national poll say that Edward Snowden is a whistle-blower, not a traitor. Interviewers asked more than 2,000 people about the National Security Agency contract worker who leaked secret documents about U.S. surveillance. They also asked about the line between privacy and security.

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4:43pm

Wed July 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Asiana Flight 214: Both Pilots Were Well-Rested, The NTSB Says

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:37 pm

National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Deborah Hersman briefs reporters on Asiana Airlines Flight 214, which crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The two main pilots on Asiana Airlines Flight 214, the jetliner that crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, had each gotten eight hours of sleep the night before their trip to San Francisco, says the National Transportation Safety Board.

The agency's chief, Deborah Hersman, provided that information and other updates to the media and the public on the investigation into the crash that killed two passengers and injured dozens.

Here are details from today's briefing:

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