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2:44am

Sun November 6, 2011
Asia

'Cake Theory' Has Chinese Eating Up Political Debate

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:58 pm

Chinese children celebrate the Communist Party in Chongqing municipality in March. Bo Xilai, the region's party secretary who is vying for a place in the Politburo Standing Committee, espouses a government-intervention model to economics.
STR AFP/Getty Images

What goes on inside China's leadership is usually played out behind the closed oxblood doors of the compound where the top leaders live. This year, though, a political debate has sprung out in the open — and it has leaders and constituents considering how to move forward politically.

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5:30pm

Sat November 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Who Benefits When A Private Prison Comes To Town?

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 7:24 am

The entrance to the Two Rivers Regional Detention Facility in Hardin, Mont. The 464-bed detention facility was built with the promise of bringing jobs and stimulating the economy, but it has sat empty since it was completed in 2007.
Matthew Brown AP

Federal and state officials are increasingly contracting private companies to run prisons and immigration detention centers.

Critics have long questioned the quality of private prisons and the promises of economic benefits where they are built. But proponents say private prisons not only save taxpayers money, but they also generate income for the surrounding community.

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3:48pm

Sat November 5, 2011
Music

From Samba To Flamenco, A Latin Grammy Preview

The Los Angeles band La Santa Cecilia is nominated in the Best Tropical Song category at this year's Latin Grammys.
Rene Miranda Courtesy of the artist

The 2011 Latin Grammy Awards will take place this Thursday in Las Vegas. For those unfamiliar with the categories and nominees, Betto Arcos of KPFK's Global Village returns to weekends on All Things Considered to play songs from a few of his favorite nominated performers. Included are a samba artist best known for his film role as a singing sailor, the reigning king of flamenco, one of Mexico's biggest bands and an L.A. ensemble that channels the various sounds of its city.

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3:28pm

Sat November 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Unlikely Advocates Fight For Gay Rights In Mich. City

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 9:33 pm

The Rev. Bill Freeman reads from a copy of the U.S. Constitution during a public hearing before the Holland City Council in June. Despite appeals from Freeman and others, the council decided not to expand its anti-discrimination laws to include gay, bisexual and transgender people.
Lindsey Smith

Last June, the city council in Holland, Mich., voted against adding sexual orientation and gender identity to its local anti-discrimination laws. Now an unlikely coalition is pressuring the city council to change that vote.

On Wednesday nights, Pastor Bill Freeman turns the podium of the city council meeting into a pulpit. He wants Holland to adopt local laws that would protect people from getting fired or kicked out of their homes because they are gay, bisexual or transgender.

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2:29pm

Sat November 5, 2011
Author Interviews

A Tale Of Forgiveness From The Tragedy Of Masada

Originally published on Sat November 5, 2011 5:33 pm

Alice Hoffman is the author of more than 30 books.
Deborah Feingold alicehoffman.com

When Jerusalem fell in 70 AD, hundreds of Jews journeyed through the desert and settled in the haven of Masada. In what is now southern Israel, Masada was an old fortress of King Herod's that sits atop an enormous rock plateau surrounded by steep cliffs.

"When I was there, I felt so moved and so connected," author Alice Hoffman tells Laura Sullivan, guest host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Hoffman was so struck by the beauty of Masada's rocky terrain, she says, that she chose to make it the backdrop in her new novel, The Dovekeepers.

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