Associated Press

tdot.state.tn.us

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Department of Transportation is halting road construction on the state's highways over the Memorial Day weekend.

The state expects nearly 700,000 drivers to be on Tennessee roads over the three-day weekend. Road work will be suspended beginning at noon on Friday and resume at 6 a.m. on Tuesday.

There may still be some lane closures and restrictions in areas where long-term construction projects are underway, and reduced speed limits will still be in effect in work zones.

seatle.gov

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Tennessee and 10 other states are suing the Obama administration over a new directive about transgender students in public schools.

The lawsuit announced Wednesday also includes Texas, Oklahoma, Alabama, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Maine, Louisiana, Utah, Arizona and Georgia. The challenge follows a federal directive to U.S. schools this month to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identity.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam plans to honor four Marines and a sailor killed in last year's shootings in Chattanooga as part of a Memorial Day ceremony on Friday.

Those killed were Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Randall Smith, and Marines Staff Sgt. David Wyatt, Sgt. Carson Holmquist, Gunnery Sgt. Thomas Sullivan and Lance Cpt. Squire "Skip" Wells.

Federal officials have determined that the shootings by Muhammad Abdulazeez, a naturalized U.S. citizen, were a terrorist-inspired event. That made the servicemen eligible to receive the Purple Heart.

maine.gov

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Documents show a Tennessee woman who died after losing her way while hiking the Appalachian Trail survived at least 26 days after getting lost.

During that time, her texts went undelivered because of poor cell reception.

The Boston Globe reports Geraldine Largay kept a journal in which she acknowledged that she expected to die in the Maine woods and that it might be years before her remains were found.

tn.gov

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The sponsor of a resolution to require the state to sue the federal government over its refugee resettlement program is unhappy with Republican Gov. Bill Haslam for refusing the sign the measure.

Haslam last week allowed the resolution to go into effect without his signature, saying that he had concerns about one branch of government telling another one what to do. The governor also asked the state attorney general for a legal opinion on whether the Legislature has the power to hire its own attorney to sue over the matter.

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