Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

America's central bank is nudging its benchmark interest rate higher, announcing a move from the current 0.25-0.50 percent to a range of 0.50 and 0.75 percent. The decision emerged from a session of the Federal Open Market Committee on Wednesday.

Dolls, bicycles and playsets are among the nearly 4 million toys that have been seized by Venezuela's government. The toys will now be sold at sharp discounts, after a regulator said a large toy distributor had hoarded the toys to push prices higher.

"Boys and girls of the country will have a happy Christmas," said William Contreras, Venezuela's national superintendent for the defense of socioeconomic rights. He added, "We will guarantee a child" gets a present.

Iran Air has finalized its historic purchase of 80 U.S.-made passenger jets, signing a deal with Boeing that's the first of its kind since the overthrow of Iran's shah in the 1970s. U.S. officials approved the deal in September, months after Iran emerged from sanctions.

A bomb exploded during Sunday mass at a Cairo church Sunday, killing at least 25 people and wounding many more, including many women and children. The blast struck a chapel next to St. Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral.

Named for St. Peter and St. Paul, the church is commonly known as El-Botroseya.

It's the deadliest attack on Egypt's Christian minority in years, as NPR's Jane Arraf reports for our Newscast unit:

Months after ISIS was pushed out of Palmyra, the extremist group is again fighting for the Syrian city in the face of heavy air strikes by Russia's military. After early reports that ISIS had retaken the city, activists are now reporting that ISIS elements withdrew to escape air raids.

From Beirut, NPR's Alice Fordham reports:

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