Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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11:54am

Mon June 2, 2014
The Two-Way

Mailman Accused Of Stealing 20,000 Pieces Of Mail

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:56 pm

A postman has been accused of stealing credit cards, Netflix movies and other items. The U.S. Postal Service says a search of Jeffrey L. Shipley's home found his apartment had bags of mail in it.
Ivana Starcevic iStockphoto

For some folks in Catonsville, Md., it must have seemed like their mail was disappearing into a black hole. Passports, money orders and Mother's Day cards are among the items a U.S. Postal Service worker is accused of stealing in the town near Baltimore.

Officials say mail carrier Jeffrey L. Shipley stole 20,000 items during a postal career that began in 1993.

From The Baltimore Sun:

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9:56am

Mon June 2, 2014
The Two-Way

Chemical Weapons Law Doesn't Apply To Jilted Lover, Supreme Court Rules

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that an international treaty wasn't meant to be invoked in an assault case in Pennsylvania.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Federal laws that were meant to prevent the international use of chemical weapons can't be applied to a woman who tried to poison her husband's mistress, the Supreme Court has ruled. Carol Anne Bond had smeared toxic chemicals in the hopes that the other woman would develop a rash.

The Supreme Court ruled that the federal law shouldn't have been used to prosecute Bond, as her actions were forbidden under state or local laws. The opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts.

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9:00am

Mon June 2, 2014
The Two-Way

Russia's Smokers Must Take It Outside, As Ban Begins

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:17 pm

Women smoke in a Moscow bar in May. Tough new anti-smoking rules took effect Sunday in Russia, banning smoking in bars, restaurants and other public spaces.
Alexander Utkin AFP/Getty Images

It's now illegal to light up in Russia's bars, restaurants and other public spaces, as a national smoking ban went into effect this month. Russian officials say the ban could save 200,000 lives a year in a country known for having many heavy smokers.

In 2009, the Russian Federation consumed 2,786 cigarettes per capita, according to the Tobacco Atlas, put out by the World Lung Foundation.

From Moscow, NPR's Corey Flintoff reports for our Newscast unit:

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8:32am

Mon June 2, 2014
The Two-Way

EPA Unveils New Proposal Targeting Greenhouse Gases

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 10:52 am

The EPA is proposing rules that would govern carbon dioxide gas emissions by U.S. power plants. Here, coal is transported via conveyor belt to the coal-fired Jim Bridger Power Plant outside Point of the Rocks, Wyo., in March.
Jim Urquhart Reuters /Landov

New federal regulations announced Monday aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 30 percent by 2030.

The draft proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency has sparked opposition from industry groups who say the changes would be prohibitively expensive. But the proposal's backers say the rules are needed to cut carbon pollution that scientists say contributes to climate change.

Update at 10:45 a.m. ET: Proposed Rule Published

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6:31am

Mon June 2, 2014
The Two-Way

Spain's King Juan Carlos Will Abdicate In Favor Of Son

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:54 am

Spain's King Juan Carlos signs a document in the Zarzuela Palace, planning his abdication, in this photo released by the Royal Palace. Juan Carlos will be replaced by his son, Crown Prince Felipe.
AP
This post was updated at 10:45 a.m. ET

The news comes as something of a surprise: King Juan Carlos of Spain is abdicating and will be succeeded by his 46-year-old son, Crown Prince Felipe.

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy made the announcement at a hastily called news conference Monday, saying that Juan Carlos is "convinced that this is the best moment for a change in the leadership of state with complete normalcy," according to El Pais.

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