Frank James

Frank James joined NPR News in April 2009 to launch the blog, "The Two-Way," with co-blogger Mark Memmott.

"The Two-Way" is the place where NPR.org gives readers breaking news and analysis — and engages users in conversations ("two-ways") about the most compelling stories being reported by NPR News and other news media.

James came to NPR from the Chicago Tribune, where he worked for 20 years. In 2006, James created "The Swamp," the paper's successful politics and policy news blog whose readership climbed to a peak of 3 million page-views a month.

Before that, James covered homeland security, technology and privacy and economics in the Tribune's Washington Bureau. He also reported for the Tribune from South Africa and covered politics and higher education.

James also reported for The Wall Street Journal for nearly 10 years.

James received a bachelor of arts degree in English from Dickinson College and now serves on its board of trustees.

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6:57pm

Thu June 13, 2013
It's All Politics

GOP Lawmakers Greet Obama's Syria Step, But Urge A Leap

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 7:21 pm

Some Republican lawmakers hope President Obama sends arms to Syria's rebels — and cruise missiles after Syrian military targets.
Jonathan Sunderman AP

Now that the Obama administration has declared that Syrian President Bashar Assad has crossed a "red line" by using chemical weapons against his own people, another rare bipartisan moment has arrived in the nation's capital.

Republicans welcomed the White House announcement Thursday that it was prepared to offer military assistance to the rebels, but their reaction contained implied criticisms of President Obama's approach to Syria up to now.

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6:18pm

Wed June 12, 2013
It's All Politics

Mass. Senate Race May Be Feeling Washington Scandal Fallout

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 7:12 pm

Recent polls suggest Massachusetts Republican Gabriel Gomez (left) is within striking distance of Rep. Ed Markey (right) in a contest for a U.S. Senate seat.
AP

With two weeks until the Massachusetts special Senate election, the obvious question is: Can Republicans pull off another stunning upset like they did three years ago?

Back then, in the very blue Bay State, Republican Scott Brown won the seat left vacant by Ted Kennedy's death by riding a Tea Party and anti-Obamacare wave amplified by voter distress over a sour economy.

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6:40pm

Tue June 11, 2013
It's All Politics

Senate's New GOP Stars Show Party's Range On Immigration

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Forget, for a moment, about the bipartisan Gang of Eight, whose members crafted the original version of the immigration bill being taken up by the Senate this week.

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2:25pm

Tue June 11, 2013
It's All Politics

Obama's Immigration Dilemma: Leading While Following

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 2:34 pm

A White House event on Tuesday, where President Obama was aware that his support for immigration legislation could be the kiss of death.
Charles Dharapak AP

If you want to observe one of Washington's most delicate balancing acts, look no further than President Obama's effort to assert leadership on immigration legislation without its coming to be identified as a new Obamalaw.

Because they're keenly aware of how nearly any legislative effort that becomes known as the president's baby almost immediately makes his political foes hellbent on stopping it and denying him a victory, Obama and other White House officials have been committed to letting Congress take the lead on major legislation like immigration reform.

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6:24pm

Mon June 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Lawmakers Work To Gauge Public Mood On NSA And Leaker

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 7:17 pm

Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden in New York's Union Square Park, on Monday. Snowden, who says he worked as a contractor at the National Security Agency and the CIA, gave classified documents to reporters, making public two sweeping U.S. surveillance programs and touching off a national debate on privacy versus security.
Richard Drew AP

When it comes to secrets leaker Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency's phone records and Internet snooping, some in Congress face a dilemma.

Namely, how to read public opinion.

Speaking off the record, aides for Republican and Democratic House lawmakers told me they are getting constituent calls on both sides: from those urging that Snowden not be prosecuted and those insisting he should be.

An aide for one congressman told me her boss's staff was holding off on issuing a statement until it had the chance to further gauge the voters' mood.

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