Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, The Two-Way, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

She holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

The people of Ireland voted by a landslide to change their socially conservative country's constitution and legalize abortion, according to exit polls.

An Irish Times/Ipsos MRBI poll late Friday suggested a "stunning victory" of 68 percent to 32 percent. "Yes" voters want to repeal the eighth amendment, which was voted into the constitution through a public referendum in 1983 and bans nearly all abortion.

Syria's military announced Monday that it cleared Damascus and its suburbs of the last elements of the Islamic state militant group, ISIS.

According to government reports, the Syrian army had driven ISIS out of the rebel group's last remaining strongholds in southern Damascus; this marks the first time that President Bashar al-Assad's government has total control of the capital since the rebellion began in 2011.

About 5 a.m. on Saturday, a police department in Ohio got an unusual call. A man reported that he was being followed home by a pig.

At least six prominent defenders of women's rights in Saudi Arabia were detained this week, six weeks before the kingdom's ban on women from driving is due to be lifted June 24.

A Chinese archaeologist who identified a long-lost clay army consisting of 8,000 soldiers died Wednesday, according to China's state media.

Zhao Kangmin first laid eyes on fragments of terra cotta warriors in 1974. Farmers some 20 miles from China's central city of Xi'an were digging a well and struck into the pieces.

There may be hope for the nearly extinct northern white rhino yet, thanks to the pregnancy of a closely related subspecies.

"Victoria," a southern white rhino in California, was impregnated through artificial insemination, researchers announced on Thursday.

"It's very exciting because this is our first pregnant rhino from artificial insemination here at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park," Barbara Durrant, director of reproductive sciences at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, told NPR.

FBI officials say they expect to charge a 59-year-old California man with "possession of an unregistered destructive device" following an investigation into an explosion on Tuesday that killed a California spa owner.

Officials were quick to add that Stephen Beal of Long Beach, is not being charged in connection with the deadly blast, but they said their investigation was continuing.

Two days after the U.S. opened its embassy in Jerusalem, Guatemala has moved its own embassy to the contested city.

Images of the Guatemalan, Israeli and U.S. flags were projected on walls of the Old City Tuesday night, in anticipation of Wednesday's inauguration.

Inside a secret annex above her father's office, Anne Frank edited passages from her first diary, the book that captured a teenager's experience of the Holocaust. What she hid underneath brown gummed paper on two pages was revealed on Tuesday — five crossed-out phrases, four risqué jokes and 33 lines about sex education and prostitution.

Behind closed doors, 10 children were living in a California home strewn with feces and rotten food. They were also physically abused for a "sadistic purpose," said Solano County Chief Deputy District Attorney Sharon Henry.

That conclusion was drawn after police received a report that the oldest child had gone missing. Officers arrived at the house on March 31 and found nine children — ranging in age from 4 months to 11 years — living in squalor.

Seventy scholars from three Muslim nations issued an edict on Friday that says violent extremism and terrorism violate the principles of Islam.

The announcement was made during a conference in Indonesia. Scholars from Pakistan, Afghanistan and Indonesia convened at the presidential palace in the city of Bogor in West Java, reported The Associated Press.

Qusay Hussein was playing volleyball with friends in the Iraqi city of Mosul Aug. 3, 2006, when a car pulled up. The driver looked him in the eyes and smiled. Then he detonated.

Everything in the 17-year-old's life was turned upside down that day. Some people died and dozens more were injured. Shrapnel shot through Hussein's skull and he lost most of his right cheek and all of his nose and vision.

He was placed in a room with patients who had already died and the doctor told his father that Hussein would soon die too.

"I'm not dead," he told his father.

Come Monday, Jerusalem will be the official home of the U.S. Embassy to Israel.

Behind locked courtroom doors, a forensic expert extracted data from Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' cellphone and email on Tuesday, trying to determine whether he had taken a partially nude photo of a woman without her consent.

Greitens denies it, and prosecutors are looking for the alleged image.

The governor, a former Navy SEAL and a rising Republican star, stands accused of taking the photo and then threatening to release it if the woman spoke of their affair. Greitens has admitted they had an extramarital relationship.

Pakistan's parliament passed a landmark bill on Tuesday that gives the country's transgender citizens fundamental rights.

The Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Act allows people to choose their gender and to have that identity recognized on official documents, including national IDs, passports and driver's licenses. The bill prohibits discrimination in schools, at work, on public modes of transit and while receiving medical care.

Thousands of gun enthusiasts have walked into Dallas' Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center to revel in displays of firearms and hunting accessories at the National Rifle Association's annual convention — but some crowds are staying outside to protest what they believe is a dire problem in America.

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds signed one of the country's most restrictive abortion bills into law on Friday.

The so-called "heartbeat" legislation bans abortions once a fetal heartbeat has been detected, at about six weeks of pregnancy. Exceptions are made in cases of rape, incest or medical emergency.

How much would you pay for a slice of 44-year-old British royal wedding cake?

Five slices of cake from what one auction house calls the "most iconic royal weddings of all times" are going up for sale, going back as far as the 1973 nuptials of Princess Anne and Capt. Mark Phillips.

There's also a slice from the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Princess Diana and a sliver of fruitcake from the 2011 wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. And there's cake from the nuptials of Prince Charles (again) and Camilla Parker Bowles and of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson.

More students walked out of their high schools on Wednesday, but this time they were walking out to support the right to bear arms.

"Stand for the Second" was organized by Will Riley, an 18-year-old high school senior from New Mexico. "It all starts [with] myself and a few of my friends in my living room, making calls," he told NPR.

The walkout comes on the heels of several larger, nationwide demonstrations that saw hundreds of thousands of students and other protesters call for gun control.

Updated at 6:16 p.m. ET

Cambridge Analytica, the firm that used data from millions of Facebook users without their knowledge, said Wednesday that it is "immediately ceasing all operations." The firm worked for President Trump's 2016 campaign.

On Jan. 23, 2017, President Trump signed an executive order that bans U.S. aid to any health organization in another country that provides, advocates or makes referrals for abortions.

Archaeologists discovered the remains of more than 140 children in Peru, children who they believe were sacrificed because of heavy rains.

Their skeletons were found on an excavated site formally known as Huanchaquito-Las Llamas — ground that was controlled by the Chimú Empire some 550 years ago, reported National Geographic in an exclusive published on Thursday.

Four mass graves that concealed thousands of victims of the Rwandan genocide for 24 years have been discovered.

The first bodies were found on Sunday at a depth of 80 feet and the excavation continues, according to The New Times in Rwanda.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reported an unusual discovery on Monday. The founder, editor and columnist of a website that bills itself as a resource for student loan news does not exist.

After she found out her husband was having an affair, Jennair Gerardot got on a train from Delaware to Pennsylvania with a wig and extra clothing, broke into the home of the other woman and fatally shot her, authorities said. Then she turned the revolver on herself.

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