Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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11:56am

Sat July 5, 2014
The Two-Way

Palestinian Teen 'Burned Alive,' According To Official

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 7:34 am

Palestinians attend the funeral of 16-year-old teen Muhammed Abu Khdair, at the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Shuafat, on Friday.
Atef Safadi EPA/Landov

A preliminary autopsy of a teenage boy who Palestinians believe was kidnapped and murdered by Jewish extremists shows that he was burned alive, according to the Palestinian attorney general.

The New York Times, citing Mohammed Al A'wewy, says that soot was found in 16-year-old Mohammad Abu Khdeir's lungs, a sign that he was alive when his body was burned. However, the exact circumstances of his death are not yet known.

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10:52am

Sat July 5, 2014
The Two-Way

Philadelphia Row House Fire Kills 4 Children

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 11:00 am

A woman cries as she walks past Philadelphia firefighters working on burned row homes on Saturday.
Michael Perez AP

A fire that swept through a stretch of Philadelphia row houses early today has killed four children in what the city's fire commissioner has described as a "tragic, tragic day."

The Associated Press reports that the fast-moving fire, which started just before 3 a.m. ET, consumed a row of two-story homes in a southwest Philadelphia neighborhood dominated by African immigrants, engulfing about 10 residences.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports that a shelter has been set up at a nearby high school to accommodate about 40 residents who were forced to flee the three-alarm fire.

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9:33am

Sat July 5, 2014
The Two-Way

Czech Petra Kvitova Wins Wimbledon Title

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 10:51 am

Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic holds the Venus Rosewater Dish trophy after defeating Eugenie Bouchard of Canada in their women's singles final tennis match at the Wimbledon.
Suzanne Plunkett Reuters/Landov

Czech Petra Kvitova beat Eugenie Bouchard in a lopsided victory to win a Grand Slam in the women's singles final at Wimbledon, besting her opponent 6-3 6-0.

The Associated Press says that in her match with Canadian Bouchard, Kvitova, who won the championship in 2011, "dominated play with her big serve, aggressive returns and flat groundstrokes."

The AP writes:

"The Czech player broke serve three times, including in the final game of the set, which lasted 32 minutes."

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8:12am

Sat July 5, 2014
The Two-Way

Arthur Disrupts July 4th Festivities, But Does Little Damage

Originally published on Sat July 5, 2014 10:53 am

Katie Bender gets some assistance from Johanna Bender, left, as they dump water from a boot while sitting on a flooded street after Hurricane Arthur passed through in Manteo, N.C., on Friday.
Gerry Broome AP

The headline in The Boston Globe sums it up: "Arthur douses, but does little damage."

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7:45am

Sat July 5, 2014
The Two-Way

Indian Nurses Back Home After Being Trapped By Fighting In Iraq

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:21 am

An Indian nurse caught up in fighting in Iraq hugs her sister after arriving at the airport in the southern Indian city of Kochi on Saturday.
Sivaram V Reuters/Landov

More than 40 Indian nurses trapped since last month in the rebel-held city of Mosul have arrived back home.

According to The Associated Press, the Indian government organized an Air India plane to fly the nurses home from Irbil.

The AP says: "Outside the airport in Kochi [in India's southern state of Kerala], hundreds of friends and relatives of the women greeted them with hugs and flowers. The nurses all looked exhausted and emotional, with one hugging her young nephew tightly."

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