Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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5:13pm

Tue April 1, 2014
The Two-Way

Mother Of Victim: More Killed By GM Ignition Switch Defect

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 6:24 pm

Laura Christian, far right, talks about how her birth daughter Amber Marie Rose was killed on July 29, 2005, in a car crash that investigators determined was linked to a defective ignition switch.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The birth mother of Amber Marie Rose, the teen whose 2005 death was the first linked to an ignition switch problem that's triggered a massive recall of General Motors vehicles, says that through a Facebook group for families of victims, she's identified at least 29 fatalities due to the defect. GM only acknowledges 13 deaths.

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12:14pm

Tue April 1, 2014
The Two-Way

Global Airlines Call For Better Tracking Method After Flight 370

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 3:02 pm

Chief Executive and Director General of the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Tony Tyler speaks during the IATA Ops Conference in Kuala Lumpur on Tuesday.
Reuters/Landov

The head of an international airline group wants a new and better way to track passenger aircraft in flight after the disappearance of Flight MH370, saying: "We cannot let another aircraft simply vanish."

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11:06am

Tue April 1, 2014
The Two-Way

China's Military Latest Target In Anti-Corruption Drive

An unfinished residence which belongs to former PLA Gen. Gu Junshan is pictured in Puyang, Henan province, in January.
CHINA STRINGER NETWORK Reuters/Landov

China's anti-corruption campaign has expanded its reach to the country's military, with a former top general being charged and news that widespread wrongdoing had been uncovered at key units of the People's Liberation Army.

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9:37am

Tue April 1, 2014
The Two-Way

NATO Chief: No Sign Russian Troops Leaving Ukraine Border

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen looks on at the start of a NATO foreign ministers meeting at the Alliance headquarters in Brussels on Tuesday.
Francois Lenoir Reuters/Landov

A day after Russian President Vladimir Putin reportedly promised that the Kremlin would withdraw some troops from near the border with Ukraine, the head of NATO says he's seen no movement as yet.

As we reported, German Chancellor Angela Merkel's office said on Monday that Putin had told her of the impending troop movement, which seemed designed to ratchet down tensions in the region after Russia's annexation of Crimea last month.

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5:41pm

Fri March 28, 2014
The Two-Way

GM Recalls More Cars Over Possible Faulty Ignition Switches

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 6:35 am

A 2010 Chevrolet Cobalt coupe sits on display at General Motors headquarters in Detroit in 2009.
David Zalubowski AP

General Motors is recalling an additional 824,000 small cars in the U.S., adding to the 1.37 million it recalled domestically last month, citing possible faulty ignition switches.

Worldwide, the latest announcement affects a total of 971,000 vehicles, on top of the 1.6 million recalled globally in February.

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