Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pages

12:16pm

Mon March 17, 2014
The Two-Way

Scientists Announce A Big-Bang Breakthrough

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 3:19 pm

This image released Monday by Harvard-led researchers represents the gravitational waves in the Cosmic Microwave Background in the microsecond after the Big Bang.
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

This post was update at 4:00 p.m. ET.

Researchers say they've discovered that gravitational waves rippled through the fabric of space-time in the first sliver of a second after the Big Bang — the first direct evidence for a mysterious, ultrarapid expansion at the dawn of the universe. If confirmed, it would represent one of the most profound insights in decades to emerge from the field of cosmology.

Read more

5:12pm

Fri March 14, 2014
The Two-Way

Boeing 777 Pilots: It's Not Easy To Disable Onboard Communications

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 6:48 pm

In this photo released by Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency, a patrol vessel of Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency searches for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane off Tok Bali Beach in Kelantan, Malaysia, on Sunday.
Uncredited AP

Commercial aviation pilots tell NPR that they would have no idea how to disable all the systems designed to automatically communicate with ground stations, though they could probably figure it out from checklists and other documentation available aboard an aircraft.

Read more

12:35pm

Fri March 14, 2014
The Two-Way

Hong Kong Says UBS Tried To Rig Interbank Lending Rate

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 1:20 pm

A directory board of Hong Kong Monetary Authority in Hong Kong. The territory's de facto central bank said evidence shows UBS tried to manipulate the interbank lending rate.
Tyrone Siu Reuters/Landov

UBS, which was fined $1.5 billion in 2012 for what regulators said was "routine and widespread" rigging of the London interbank offered rate, or Libor, has been censured for trying to do the same thing with Hong Kong's benchmark rate between 2006 and 2009.

Read more

10:52am

Fri March 14, 2014
The Two-Way

Man On U.S. Army's 'Most Wanted' List Nabbed After 37 Years

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 12:53 pm

Unidentified military police captains depart the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., in 2007. Jones escaped from the U.S. Army's maximum-security prison in 1977.
Orlin Wagner AP

James Robert Jones was arrested without incident on Thursday, 37 years after he escaped from the U.S. Army's maximum-security prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., where he was serving time for first-degree murder and aggravated assault.

Jones, 69, was on the U.S. Army's 15 Most Wanted list. He was taken into custody as he showed up to his job in Pompano Beach, Fla.

The Associated Press says:

Read more

12:16pm

Thu March 13, 2014
The Two-Way

When Bad Things Happen To Planes, Flight Codes Get 'Retired'

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 9:00 am

The charred tail section of Delta Flight 191 sits near a runway at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in August 1985 after it crashed on approach. Delta quickly retired the "191" designation.
Carlos Osorio AP

Malaysia Airlines announced Thursday that it will stop using two flight numbers associated with the plane that disappeared over the Gulf of Thailand on March 8, following a long-standing practice of retiring codes after similar incidents.

Flight MH370 vanished en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people aboard. That number, which Malaysian Airlines uses to denote that particular route, will no longer be used after Friday as a "mark of respect" for the passengers and crew. MH371, the code used for the return flight, also will be retired.

Read more

Pages