All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 3-5PM
Michele Norris & Robert Siegal
Melissa Block
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Composer ID: 
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4:29pm

Tue November 26, 2013
A Blog Supreme

Drummer Chico Hamilton, West Coast Jazz Pioneer, Dies

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 6:17 pm

Chico Hamilton.
Todd Boebel Courtesy of the artist

3:51pm

Tue November 26, 2013
Middle East

Meet The 'Arabs Got Talent' Star Who Doesn't Speak Arabic

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:56 pm

A Massachusetts woman is getting a lot of attention in the Arab world where she's advanced to the final of Arabs Got Talent. Jennifer Grout can't speak Arabic, but she sings flawlessly in Arabic.

3:51pm

Tue November 26, 2013
Media

Report: Humane Association Covered Up Animal Abuse On Hollywood Sets

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:56 pm

An investigation by The Hollywood Reporter alleges that the American Humane Association has tried to cover up instances of animal abuse and deaths on Hollywood sets. Melissa Block talks with Gary Baum, a senior writer for the magazine who reported the story.

3:51pm

Tue November 26, 2013
Energy

Colo. Fracking Votes Put Pressure On Energy Companies

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 7:45 pm

A vote to ban fracking in Broomfield, a suburb of Denver, headed to a recount this month after the measure failed by just 13 votes. Broomfield was one of four Front Range towns considering limits or bans on the drilling procedure some fear may not be safe.
Kristen Wyatt AP

The 2013 election marked a victory for foes of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in Colorado. Voters in three Front Range communities decided to put limits on the practice.

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2:19pm

Tue November 26, 2013
Code Switch

Trove Of Artifacts Trumpets African-American Triumphs

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 5:44 pm

Hence We Come, by Norman Lewis
Courtesy of The Kinsey Collection

Seventeen-year-old Tonisha Owens stared wide-eyed at the faded script on an 1854 letter. It was once carried by another 17-year-old — a slave named Frances. The letter was written by a plantation owner's wife to a slave dealer, saying that she needed to sell her chambermaid to pay for horses. But Frances didn't know how to read or write, and didn't know what she carried.

"She does not know she is to be sold. I couldn't tell her," the letter reads. "I own all her family and the leave taking would be so distressing that I could not."

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