All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 3-5PM
Michele Norris & Robert Siegal
Melissa Block
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f509e1c88059a9100aaa|5187f501e1c88059a9100a96

Pages

3:26pm

Thu September 5, 2013
NPR Story

What Elevated Kale From Vegetable To Cultural Identifier?

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:10 pm

Of all the healthy foods you could eat, what inspires some people to wear kale T-shirts and sport kale stickers? Why do some people see kale as a part of their identities?

3:26pm

Thu September 5, 2013
NPR Story

Illegal Immigration A Hot Issue In Australian Election

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:10 pm

A tightly-fought Australian general election campaign reaches its climax on Saturday — and the major issues will be familiar to an American audience. With little to choose between the economic policies of the two major parties, immigration and same-sex marriage are top of the news agenda.

2:38pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Joe's Big Idea

Coronal Holes: The (Rarely Round) Gaps In The Sun's Atmosphere

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:21 pm

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this picture of the sun on June 18. The dark blue area in the upper left quadrant of the sun is a huge coronal hole more than 400,000 miles across. Coronal holes are areas of the sun's outermost atmospheric layer — the corona — where the magnetic field opens up and solar material quickly flows out.
NASA/SDO

There's a hole in the sun's corona. But don't worry — that happens from time to time.

"A coronal hole is just a big, dark blotch that we see on the sun in our images," says Dean Pesnell, project scientist for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. "We can only see them from space, because when we look at them [through] a regular telescope, they don't appear."

Read more

1:30pm

Thu September 5, 2013
The Two-Way

The Incredible Case Of The Bank Robber Who's Now A Law Clerk

Originally published on Sat October 26, 2013 1:03 pm

After serving almost 11 years in federal prison for bank robbery, Shon Hopwood is a law student at the University of Washington. He's landed a prestigious law clerk's position with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.
Sang Cho Courtesy of The Daily of the University of Washington

"I had no prior history with the law other than breaking it."

"I thought, 'this kid is a punk.' "

Read more

4:49pm

Wed September 4, 2013
Shots - Health News

Multitasking After 60: Video Game Boosts Focus, Mental Agility

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

Strenuous mental exercise like reading difficult books, solving tricky math problems — or, maybe, playing the right video game — can help keep a healthy brain sharp, research suggests.
Images.com/Corbis

A brain that trains can stay in the fast lane. That's the message of a study showing that playing a brain training video game for a month can rejuvenate the multitasking abilities of people in their 60s, 70s and 80s.

"After training, they improved their multitasking beyond the level of 20-year-olds," says Adam Gazzaley, one of the study's authors and a brain scientist at the University of California, San Francisco.

Read more

Pages