All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 3-5PM
Michele Norris & Robert Siegal
Melissa Block
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6:11pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Around the Nation

Ghost Island Looms Large Among Displaced Inupiat Eskimos

King Island is only accessible via helicopter or chartered boat.
Rachel D'Oro AP

Out in Alaska's Bering Sea, about 90 miles from Nome, sits a small, rocky island that used to be home to a couple of hundred Inupiat Eskimos. They lived in houses built on stilts, perched on rocky cliffs.

Then, about 50 years ago, the threat of rock slides, the spread of tuberculosis and the loss of men to World War II forced residents to relocate to the mainland. King Island has been a ghost island ever since.

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3:40pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Technology

NSA Leak Could Be Bad Business For U.S. Tech Companies

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:11 pm

The disclosure of previously secret National Security Agency surveillance programs has left many Americans worried that the privacy of their personal data and communications is in jeopardy.

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3:27pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Media

Is It Ethical? Universities Pay Newspaper For Coverage

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:11 pm

Copies of The Orange County Register slide through the presses. The Register is the country's 20th most-read daily, with a circulation of about 285,000.
Grant Slater KPCC

This spring, readers of The Orange County Register in Southern California started seeing much more coverage of local universities. What they probably did not know is that the stories are paid for by the schools. Depending on whom you ask, it is either a smart way to bring in revenue, or a serious breach of journalism ethics.

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3:15pm

Fri June 21, 2013
Monkey See

The Kendama: Can A Wooden Toy Be A Viral Sensation?

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 6:11 pm

The traditional Kendama is making a splash with kids.
Norasit Kaewsai iStockphoto.com

6:04pm

Thu June 20, 2013
The Salt

How Circadian Rhythms Give Vegetables A Healthy Boost

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 3:56 pm

Researchers at Rice University conducted lab studies using light-dark cycles to try to coax more beneficial compounds out of fruits and vegetables.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Just as we have internal clocks that help regulate the systems in our bodies, fruit and vegetable plants have circadian rhythms, too.

And a new study published in Current Biology finds there may be a way to boost some of the beneficial compounds in plants by simulating the light-dark cycle after crops are harvested.

So, how does it work?

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