All Things Considered

Monday-Friday 3-5PM
Michele Norris & Robert Siegal
Melissa Block
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f509e1c88059a9100aaa|5187f501e1c88059a9100a96

Pages

4:49pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Shots - Health News

Health Law Spared Young Adults From High Hospital Bills

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:18 pm

Researchers at the RAND Corporation set out to find some hard data on one aspect of the health law: Does having medical insurance protect young adults from the financial ruin that often comes with a major injury or illness?

The quick answer: Yep.

Since September 2010, the Affordable Care Act allowed young adults to remain on their parents' medical insurance until they turn 26, and 3.1 million young people have taken advantage of the new rule.

Read more

4:11pm

Wed May 29, 2013
NPR Story

For Tuskegee Airman George Porter, Failure Was Not An Option

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:18 pm

George Porter, one of the original Tuskegee Airmen, at his home in Sacramento, Calif., in 2007. Porter joined the armed forces in 1942 and served as a crew chief, squadron inspector and flight engineer with the Army Air Forces and the Air Force.
Paul Kitagaki Jr. MCT/Landov

Sixteen million men and women served in uniform during World War II. Today, 1.2 million are still alive, but hundreds of those vets are dying every day. In honor of Memorial Day, NPR's All Things Considered is remembering some of the veterans who died this year.

Read more

4:11pm

Wed May 29, 2013
NPR Story

Study: Obamacare Already Benefiting Young Adults

It's been more than two years since the Affordable Care Act began to take effect. The biggest changes won't start until next year, when coverage will be extended to tens of millions of people But a new study released Wednesday from the RAND corporation shows the law is already having a significant positive impact on one group of Americans — young adults.

4:11pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Reporter's Notebook

Midcentury Furniture + Grandkid Nostalgia = Modern Trend

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:18 pm

NPR's Andrea Hsu paid $75 for her midcentury modern table and chairs, shown here in a 1963 Drexel Declaration catalog. She quickly realized it was a steal.
Courtesy Drexel Heritage

Open a design magazine or turn on a home decorating show these days, and it's clear: Midcentury modern is hot. It first showed up in the 1950s and '60s — think low-slung sofas, egg-shaped chairs and the set of Mad Men. My first midcentury modern find was a dining set I bought on Craigslist for $75. There was something about the clean lines and gentle curves of the wooden chairs that got me.

Read more

3:28pm

Wed May 29, 2013
Parallels

In China, Customer Service And Efficiency Begin To Blossom

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:56 pm

A couple waits for a high-speed train in the Chinese city of Qinhuangdao. Modern infrastructure and the expanding private sector have greatly increased efficiency and customer service in many parts of Chinese life.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

China's infamous bureaucracy has bedeviled people for ages, but in recent years, daily life in some major Chinese cities has become far more efficient.

For instance, when I worked in Beijing in the 1990s, many reporters had drivers. It wasn't because they didn't drive, but because they needed someone to deal with China's crippling bureaucracy.

I had a man named Old Zhao, who would drive around for days to pay our office bills at various government utility offices. Zhao would sit in line for hours, often only to be abused by functionaries.

Read more

Pages