fcc

So, after the latest Supreme Court ruling about indecency, broadcast stations can do anything they want, right? Wrong.

WASHINGTON (AP/WMOT) — A Middle Tennessee professor who specializes in free-speech issues says television stations will likely be minding their manners for a while as a result of a Supreme Court ruling on indecency.

The justices yesterday threw out fines and other penalties against Fox and ABC stations that violated the FCC's policy regulating curse words and nudity on TV.

The case revolved around obscenities uttered during an awards show on Fox, and brief nudity on ABC. The justices said the FCC is free to revise its indecency policy.

MTSU

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. --  Almost everyone agrees that broadcasters should be prohibited from broadcasting “indecent” material.  And Federal Communications Commission rules, in fact, ban such broadcasts.  So let me ask you this:  What, exactly, is “indecent” material?

    This is the issue argued last week before the U.S. Supreme Court, in a case that challenges how the government regulates indecent broadcasts.  Note that the issue is not if the government can regulate such material rather, the question deals with how the rules are enforced.

Burris On Media: Candidates

Oct 24, 2011

Quick, answer this question: how many candidates are running for president? For extra credit, how many candidates are republicans and how many are democrats?

Do you have the answer? Well, if you said anything but none, you’d be wrong. That’s right, there are no candidates. At this point there are presidential hopefuls, presidential contenders and presidential wanna-be’s. But there won’t be any official candidates until after the nominating conventions later this year.

So why is that important?