Science

11:06am

Wed April 9, 2014
Science

Tennessee Researchers Ask, "Is Suicide Contagious?"

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  --  A study released this month by researchers at the University of Memphis suggests suicide can be contagious, especially among young people.

Sociologist Anna Mueller and colleague Seth Arbrutyn conducted the study. Their findings indicate suicide is what Mueller calls “socially contagious.” If a friend or family member commits suicide, people they know are likely to think about or attempt suicide.

Mueller says the tendency is especially pronounced in young people

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10:30am

Mon March 10, 2014
Science

Brentwood Student Tries for $100,000 Science Prize

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  --  A Brentwood High School student is competing this week for a $100,000 science prize in the nation’s capital.

Brentwood High senior Joyce Kang is the lone finalist from Tennessee and one of 40 students chosen to attend the 2014 Intel Science Talent Search.

Kang presented her project to judges yesterday. She created a new, simple, low-cost process for storing energy that involves super-capacitors, carbon fiber, and nano tubes.

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6:24am

Tue January 28, 2014
Science

Vanderbilt Autism Research: Working Helps

Dr. Julie Lounds Taylor
Credit vanderbilt.edu

MUFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT) --  A mid-state researcher recently concluded a ground breaking study concerning the growing number of individuals with autism.

Recent data suggests the number of children born with autism is on the rise, with one child in 88 affected. Autism is a brain function disorder that makes communication and social interaction difficult.

Vanderbilt Researcher Dr. Jule Lounds Taylor is co-author of a new, long-term study that looks at the relationship between autism and work.

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10:55am

Mon January 27, 2014
Science

Bee Keeping Makes Dramatic Comeback in Tennessee

Credit nashbee.org/

MURFREESBORO, Tenn, (WMOT)  --  The number of Tennesseans keeping bees has grown dramatically in recent years, according to local keepers.

Nashville Area Beekeepers Association President Joel White says the number of active hives in the state continues to grow.

"in 2007, there were less than 6,000 colonies of bees in the State of Tennessee. Last year, for the first time, it’s gone over 20,000. So, yes, more people are becoming interested in it. Last year in our beginning bee school that we had in February we had 123 people take the class.”

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7:41am

Fri November 15, 2013
Science

Tenn. Baby Illnesses Tied to Parents Nixing Newborn Shot

Credit cdc.gov

 

 

ATLANTA (AP) — Health officials are reporting four Tennessee cases of a rare infant illness that have been linked to parents refusing a routine shot for newborns.

 

The four Nashville-area infants suffered brain or stomach bleeding earlier this year. Their parents had declined vitamin K shots, which have routinely been given to newborns since 1961. The shots improve blood clotting and prevent internal bleeding. All four children were treated with vitamin K and survived.

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