tennessee

11:56am

Thu June 7, 2012
Top Stories

Report Paints a Bleak Portrait of Tenn. Children

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth released its annual look at the welfare of the state’s children earlier this week and the news is grim.

The report is based on data from 2009, the most recent information available. It shows that more than 350,000 Tennessee children, or nearly one-child-in-four, lives below the poverty line.

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8:04am

Thu June 7, 2012
Top Stories

Injuction Filed in Murfreesboro Mosque Case

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) — Opponents of the Murfreesboro Mosque filed for an injunction yesterday in Rutherford County seeking to stop the Mosque’s construction.

Just last week Judge Robert Corlew declared void the 2010 county planning meeting at which the mosque’s construction plan was approved. Corlew opined in his written decision that county officials violated Tennessee’s Sunshine Laws by failing to give sufficient public notice for the meeting.

However, Corlew refused to halt the mosque’s ongoing construction.

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7:00am

Wed June 6, 2012
Opinion

Burriss on Media: Open Meetings

Dr. Larry Burriss
MTSU

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (BURRISS)  --  It’s amazing sometimes how what we think of as obscure laws can have such unforeseen consequences. For example, all of a sudden the Tennessee Open Meeting law is in the news, with some unexpected results.

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4:57am

Wed June 6, 2012
Top Stories

Help for Bottom Five Percent of Tenn. Schools

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Seven new charter schools will open next year in Memphis and Nashville. They’re being formed by the special school district Tennessee created to reform the state’s most troubled school systems.

Superintendent Chris Barbic heads the statewide Achievement School District, The district was formed as part of Tennessee's response to the federal Race to the Top initiative. Barbic says the ASD’s mandate is different from that of locally organized charters.

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11:11am

Tue June 5, 2012
Top Stories

Tennessee Farmers "Resigned" to Subsidy Changes

WASHINGTON (AP/WMOT) — A program that puts billions of dollars in the pockets of farmers may disappear soon with hardly a protest from Tennessee farm groups and politicians.

As early as today, the U.S. Senate could begin debating a five-year farm and food aid bill that would save $9.3 billion by ending direct payments to farmers. The details are still to be worked out. But there's rare agreement that fixed annual subsidies of $5 billion a year for farmers are no longer feasible in this age of tight budgets.

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