tennessee

City of Memphis

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP/WMOT) — Tennessee’s new voter photo ID law is facing two new legal challenges.

Memphis officials are appealing a Nashville judge's ruling on the state requirement of photo identification for voting.

According to The Commercial Appeal, attorneys for the City of Memphis filed an appeal late Wednesday with the Tennessee Court of Appeals.

The city claims the new requirement is a violation of the state constitution.

Memphis is asking for an emergency appeal and lawyers hope for an expedited ruling.

Nissan

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (WMOT)  -- Some disappointing sales numbers were released Wednesday by one of Middle Tennessee’s biggest employers.

Nissan reported a sales drop in September of 2.4 percent. The company’s North American division, headquartered in Franklin, fared somewhat better with a sales decline of just over one percent.

There were some bright spots. Sales of the Nissan Rogue and Pathfinder were both up significantly.

Nissan says September sales of its new LEAF, all-electric vehicle, were the best the car has seen this year.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Barak Obama and presidential challenger Mitt Romney are spending the day preparing for their first debate, scheduled for Wednesday night.

President Barack Obama is in Henderson, Nev., for a strategy run-through ahead of the debate in Denver.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney is set to spend most of Tuesday in debate prep at a Denver hotel.

As the debate season gets underway, WMOT News is asking Tennesseans what one question they would ask the candidates if given the chance.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP/WMOT)– New meningitis cases are being reported in Middle Tennessee for the third time this week and the fourth time in a month.

WTVF-TV says officials are reporting four to seven cases of viral meningitis Tuesday among students at Oak View Elementary in Williamson County. Cleaning crews are in the process of disinfecting the school.

Monday the Centers for Disease Control reported that they’re investigating 11 cases of meningitis tied to a Saint Thomas facility in Nashville. Two patients involved in that case have since died.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A judge in Nashville has upheld Tennessee's voter identification statute.

The Tennessean reports that after about three hours of oral arguments yesterday, Judge Carol McCoy ruled against civil rights attorney George Barrett in the case. Barrett contended the state constitution requires only proof of legal age, residency and registration to vote.

The judge responded that voting procedures have evolved over the years and the legislature can enact laws that secure what the court termed "the purity of the ballot box."

Pages